The Recovering Americans and the ‘Top Secret’ Ebola Treatment

Because Kent Brantly is a physician who has watched people die of Ebola, there was an especially chilling prescience to his assessment last week, between labored breaths: “I am going to die.” His condition was grave. But then on Saturday, we saw images of Brantly’s heroic return to U.S. soil, walking with minimal assistance fromContinue reading “The Recovering Americans and the ‘Top Secret’ Ebola Treatment”

Neuroscientist Says NIH Funding Squeeze Causing ‘Crisis’ in Biomedical Enterprise

By Jeannie Baumann Many scientists now spend more time scrambling to raise money for their work than actually doing the research because of the erosion of NIH funding over the last decade, the president of a biomedical research university said during a June 18 congressional briefing. Mark Tessier-Lavigne said the 25 percent decline in theContinue reading “Neuroscientist Says NIH Funding Squeeze Causing ‘Crisis’ in Biomedical Enterprise”

NIH Report Warns of Looming Physician-Scientist Shortage

Recently the mainstream has come to embrace the fact that the job market for Ph.D. biomedical researchers is overcrowded. According to a new report from a working group of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), the job market looks very different for physician-scientists. In fact, “[t]here may not beContinue reading “NIH Report Warns of Looming Physician-Scientist Shortage”

NIH Gears Up for a Closer Look at the Human Placenta

A placenta sustained you and every person ever born for 9 months, serving as your lungs and kidneys and pumping out hormones while you developed in the womb. Problems with this disk-shaped mass of tissue can contribute to everything from preterm births to diseases of middle age. Yet when a baby is born, hospitals usuallyContinue reading “NIH Gears Up for a Closer Look at the Human Placenta”

What I’ve Learned: Sol Snyder

Sol Snyder, Distinguished Service Professor of Neuroscience, Pharmacology and Psychiatry, School of Medicine Growing up, I never had any strong interest in science. I did well in lots of things in high school. I liked reading philosophy and things like that, but being a philosopher is not a fit job for a nice Jewish boy.Continue reading “What I’ve Learned: Sol Snyder”

Today’s awardee for 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, James Rothman, hopes it will help him secure funds for the research for which he won the prize.

STOCKHOLM (AP) — Two Americans and a German-American won the Nobel Prize in medicine on Monday for discovering how key substances are transported within cells, a process involved in such important activities as brain cell communication and the release of insulin. James Rothman, 62, of Yale University, Randy Schekman, 64, of the University of California,Continue reading “Today’s awardee for 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, James Rothman, hopes it will help him secure funds for the research for which he won the prize.”

Psychiatry’s Guide Is Out of Touch With Science, Experts Say

Just weeks before the long-awaited publication of a new edition of the so-called bible of mental disorders, the federal government’s most prominent psychiatric expert has said the book suffers from a scientific “lack of validity.” The expert, Dr. Thomas R. Insel, director of the National Institute of Mental Health, said in an interview Monday thatContinue reading “Psychiatry’s Guide Is Out of Touch With Science, Experts Say”

Doubts about Johns Hopkins research have gone unanswered, scientist says

Daniel Yuan, pictured at his home in Laurel, raised doubts for years about the work of his colleagues in a Johns Hopkins medical research lab. “The denial that I am hearing from almost everyone in the group as a consensus is troubling to me,” he wrote in one e-mail. In December 2011, after 10 yearsContinue reading “Doubts about Johns Hopkins research have gone unanswered, scientist says”

Flip of a single molecular switch makes an old brain young

The flip of a single molecular switch helps create the mature neuronal connections that allow the brain to bridge the gap between adolescent impressionability and adult stability. Now Yale School of Medicine researchers have reversed the process, recreating a youthful brain that facilitated both learning and healing in the adult mouse. Scientists have long knownContinue reading “Flip of a single molecular switch makes an old brain young”

Researchers claim NIH grant process is ‘totally broken’

  John Ioannidis, a researcher at Stanford University has, along with graduate student Joshua Nicholson, published a commentary piece in the journal Nature, taking the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to task for maintaining a system that they say rewards conformity while ignoring innovation. NIH is an agency within the US Department of Health andContinue reading “Researchers claim NIH grant process is ‘totally broken’”