Archive for the ‘India’ Category

Former Asian medalists Suresh Kumar Patel, Inderjit Patel and Soji Mathew got the shock of their life on Sunday while leading the race in half marathon when the pilot vehicle reportedly missed the U-turn on Old-airport road, leading to the trio abandoning the race in the Bengaluru marathon.

Suresh, who finished sixth in the recent Asian Games, and Soji, a former Asian cross-country champion, finally had to beg morning joggers for Rs 20 to enable them to hop on to the metro from the Indiranagar station and return to MG Road.

“There were no officials on the road where we supposed to take a U-turn (at 16km). We were following the pilot vehicle and we had covered around 20 kilometers in one hour as we were going at a pace of 2 minutes, 59 seconds per kilometer. We were hoping to finish soon when the officials asked us to turn back. At that point there was no point in continuing the race and we decided to stop,” Inderjit Patel told TOI.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/sports/more-sports/athletics/Leading-pack-led-astray-in-farcical-Bangalore-half-marathon/articleshow/44884022.cms

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Above is video of what happened when an Indian man went to a doctor complaining of an ear ache.

The doctor told the man, believed to be from Southern India, that he had a two-inch cricket lodged in his ear canal, which was then removed with tweezers as shown.

An expert told the Daily Star that the insect is likely a house cricket.

“These critters are known to be an invasive species, appearing all over the globe,” Michael Sweet, lecturer at the University of Derby and invertebrate biology expert, told the paper.

“It is likely this cricket crawled into the man’s ear while he was sleeping and was just hiding there until night came around.”

It is not believed the pest caused the man any harm.

http://www.aol.com/article/2014/10/09/the-amazing-moment-a-live-cricket-is-extracted-from-a-mans-ear/20975693/

Thanks to Mrs. Lindley for bringing this to the attention of the It’s Interesting community.

The family and followers of one of India’s wealthiest Hindu spiritual leaders are fighting a legal battle over whether he is dead or simply in a deep state of meditation.

His Holiness Shri Ashutosh Maharaj, the founder of the Divya Jyoti Jagrati Sansthan religious order with a property estate worth an estimated £100 million, died in January, according to his wife and son.

However, his disciples at his Ashram have refused to let the family take his body for cremation because they claim he is still alive.

According to his followers, based in the Punjab city of Jalandhar, he simply went into a deep Samadhi or meditation and they have frozen his body to preserve it for when he wakes from it.

His body is currently contained in a commercial freezer at their Ashram.

The late – or living – guru, who was in his seventies, established his sect in 1983 to promote “self-awakening to global peace” and to create a world “wherein every individual becomes an embodiment of truth, fraternity and justice through the eternal science of self-realisation”.

Today the group has thousands of followers around the world and owns dozens of large properties throughout India, the United States, South America, Australia, the Middle East and Europe, including its British headquarters in Hayes, Middlesex.

While he is thought to have died from a heart attack, his devotees believe he has simply drifted into a deeper form of the meditation he promotes as a pathway to self-realisation.

A statement on the group’s website reads: “His Holiness Shri Ashutosh Maharaj ji has been in deep meditative state (Samadhi) since 29th January 2014.”

According to one of his aides, who asked not to be named, “Maharaj has been in deep meditation. He has spent many years meditating in sub-zero temperatures in the Himalayas, there is nothing unusual in it. He will return to life as soon as he feels and we will ensure his body is preserved until then”, he said.

His body is held in a guarded room in a deep freezer on his 100 acre retreat in Nurmahal, Jalandhar, where only a few elders and sect doctors are allowed to enter.

Although Punjab Police initially confirmed his death, the Punjab High Court later dismissed its status report and local governmental officials said it was a spiritual matter and that the guru’s followers cannot be forced to believe he is dead.

Now his wife and son have filed a court application calling for an investigation into the circumstances of his death and for his body to be released for cremation.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/india/10860998/Indian-court-asked-to-rule-on-whether-Hindu-guru-dead-or-meditating.html

cow

Demand for ‘Gomutra Arka’, a medicine distilled out of cow urine, is on the rise in Mangalore, India. An arka manufacturer on the outskirts of the city, who supplies around 10 litres a day, claims that even the educated are using the ayurvedic preparation regularly to prevent diseases.

Govanithashraya Trust manufactures gomutra arka at its goshala (cow shelter) in Beejaguri at Pajeer, 26 km from the city. Goshala in-charge Santhosh Kumar told TOI that they have plans to expand the manufacture unit as the demand for gomutra arka is increasing.

“We take care of more than 300 cows of various breeds. “Gomutra arka is effective in checking 109 types of diseases if consumed regularly as per the prescribed dosage. It increases resistance power, life span and purifies the blood, reduces cholesterol and checks obesity. It is also effective in skin diseases, acidity, kidney ailments and other diseases,” he claimed adding that even doctors use it routinely to prevent diseases.

Cow urine collected from local breeds like malenadu gidda, hallikaru and kankrej are used to make arka. “An average of 10 litres of arka is sold at our outlet in the city. There are other manufacturers, who also market arka in the city,” he added.

Santhosh underwent training in making organic products from panchagavyas (cow urine, cow dung, milk, ghee and curd) at a goshala in Devarapur in Nagpur. He makes medicines like gomootra arka, ghanvati, harde churna, kala taila, madhu meha churna, padasputana, goumaya taila, soundarya face pack, tooth powder, kapila bath soap and many other items using panchagavyas and medicinal herbs at the goshala. The products made at the goshala are sold through an outlet in the city.

http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2013-02-15/mangalore/37118603_1_cow-urine-cow-dung-cow-shelter

gold-shirt-guy

India has long had a love affair with gold. But one businessman there is so infatuated with the precious metal, he dropped about $230,000 on solid gold shirt.

More than two dozen goldsmiths toiled for 15 days for lender Datta Phuge, who custom ordered the seven-pound top to wear for New Year’s festivities, according to the Pune Mirror. The shirt is crafted from 14,000 22-karat gold rings linked together and comes with six Swarovski crystal buttons and a belt also made of gold.

Phuge said he considers the shirt “an investment which will keep appreciating.”

“People buy cars and go on holidays abroad,” he told the Mirror. “For me, gold is the ultimate passion. That is the reason I have spent a whopping amount of money on the shirt.”

That kind of thinking isn’t unique in India, where gold represents wealth and financial security in much the way that owning a home does in the United States. HSBC recently predicted that gold prices would jump this year thanks in part to demand from Indian customers like Phuge.

To ring in 2013, Phuge planned to trot out the shirt along with 11 pounds of gold accessories including chains, bracelets and rings, the Mirror reported.

He just custom ordered a gold case to suitably dress up his Nokia phone as well, it said.

As for any potential thieves or muggers out there, he doesn’t seem to be worried.

“I have my own security system in place,” he told the Mirror. “I always move around with bodyguards.”

http://www.latimes.com/business/money/la-fi-mo-india-gold-shirt-20130104,0,4008091.story

srinivasa_ramanujan_-_opc_-_1

theta-function

While on his death bed, the brilliant Indian mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan cryptically wrote down functions he said came to him in dreams, with a hunch about how they behaved. Now 100 years later, researchers say they’ve proved he was right.

“We’ve solved the problems from his last mysterious letters. For people who work in this area of math, the problem has been open for 90 years,” Emory University mathematician Ken Ono said.

Ramanujan, a self-taught mathematician born in a rural village in South India, spent so much time thinking about math that he flunked out of college in India twice, Ono said.

But he sent mathematicians letters describing his work, and one of the most preeminent ones, English mathematician G. H. Hardy, recognized the Indian boy’s genius and invited him to Cambridge University in England to study. While there, Ramanujan published more than 30 papers and was inducted into the Royal Society. [Creative Genius: The World’s Greatest Minds]

“For a brief window of time, five years, he lit the world of math on fire,” Ono told LiveScience.

But the cold weather eventually weakened Ramanujan’s health, and when he was dying, he went home to India.

It was on his deathbed in 1920 that he described mysterious functions that mimicked theta functions, or modular forms, in a letter to Hardy. Like trigonometric functions such as sine and cosine, theta functions have a repeating pattern, but the pattern is much more complex and subtle than a simple sine curve. Theta functions are also “super-symmetric,” meaning that if a specific type of mathematical function called a Moebius transformation is applied to the functions, they turn into themselves. Because they are so symmetric these theta functions are useful in many types of mathematics and physics, including string theory.

Ramanujan believed that 17 new functions he discovered were “mock modular forms” that looked like theta functions when written out as an infinte sum (their coefficients get large in the same way), but weren’t super-symmetric. Ramanujan, a devout Hindu, thought these patterns were revealed to him by the goddess Namagiri.

Ramanujan died before he could prove his hunch. But more than 90 years later, Ono and his team proved that these functions indeed mimicked modular forms, but don’t share their defining characteristics, such as super-symmetry.

The expansion of mock modular forms helps physicists compute the entropy, or level of disorder, of black holes.

In developing mock modular forms, Ramanujan was decades ahead of his time, Ono said; mathematicians only figured out which branch of math these equations belonged to in 2002.

“Ramanujan’s legacy, it turns out, is much more important than anything anyone would have guessed when Ramanujan died,” Ono said.

The findings were presented last month at the Ramanujan 125 conference at the University of Florida, ahead of the 125th anniversary of the mathematician’s birth on Dec. 22.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/researchers-unlock-formula-mathematician-srinivasa-ramanujan-2012-12#ixzz2GTAEauqP

Thanks to Kebmodee for bringing this to the attention of the It’s Interesting community.

800px-Tree_house_in_Neubrandenburg-2-620x350

A man in India has been hiding up a tree for the past nine months waiting for his unfaithful wife to apologise. It all started when the man, known simply as Sanjay, caught his wife in an overly familiar position with the next door neighbour in their flat in Mumbai.

Sanjay promptly returned back with his wife to their home village so they could reconcile their differences, but in March when she insisted on returning to Mumbai, Sanjay threw an almighty hissy fit, climbing up a guava tree and not coming down.

Sanjay eats, sleeps and even relieves himself from the top of the tree. He says he will climb down only when his wife apologises to him for her infidelity.

Sanjay’s family members have made several attempts to bring his wife Tara back but she is unrelenting.

“He climbed on to this tree on March 9 and has remained there ever since. Whenever we try to bring him down, he threatens to commit suicide. He eats and sleeps on the tree and even relives himself from there. We keep going to him and asking him if he needs anything,” says Kushma Devi, Sanjay’s mother.

The local villagers claim that Sanjay, sometimes, climbs down from the tree and takes a stroll but climbs back again when he sees someone coming towards him.

Seeing his determination, the villagers have not yet informed the police. “We apprehend that he may harm himself if we seek outside help. As long as he is safe there, we are happy for him,” says his sister Nisha.

http://www.asianage.com/india/man-remains-perched-tree-march-967