Archive for the ‘Cow’ Category

A field of cowbell-equipped-cows may create a soothing soundscape of wind and chimes, but what’s soothing to us doesn’t translate to the cows. Though Christopher Walken and internet humor from over 14 years ago require more cowbell, it turns out the actual bovine after which the bells are named really hate the things.

A study was performed as part of a doctoral dissertation for the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich where agricultural scientist Julia Johns and a colleague measured the decibel levels of cowbells. The team attached 12-pound cowbells to over 100 cows across 25 locations around the country, and it turns out the cowbells can reach decibel levels of 113 — far above the legal limit of 85. The cowbells aren’t just over the legal limit, but reach a level of noise equivalent to a jackhammer or a chainsaw.

The team studied the cows reactions, and found that the cows exposed to the cowbells chew their food for significantly less time than the cows without the bells, and some cows have even proven to have their hearing severely impaired.

The team does admit that the weight of the bells could also negatively affect the cows, but a slightly heavy cowbell necklace likely wouldn’t cause hearing impairment.

Farmers use the bells to locate cows grazing in pasture, but researchers have suggested replacing them with GPS trackers. However, the farmers claim that poor reception in the mountainous areas would make that solution difficult.

http://www.geek.com/geek-cetera/it-turns-out-that-cowbells-make-cows-miserable-1605552/

fALLING-COW-KILLS-MAN-facebook

The one-tonne cow was grazing on a hill behind the small house, in the town of Caratinga, when it stepped onto the asbestos roof, which collapsed under its weight.

Joao Maria de Souza, 45, was lying in bed when the animal fell on him.

He was taken to hospital and died the day after, reportedly of internal bleeding.

Mr Souza was conscious and appeared to be in a good condition, but he had to wait too long to be seen by a doctor, relatives said.

Local media says this is the third such incident in the region in the past three years.

There were no casualties in the two previous incidents.

In the first occasion, there was no one inside the house when the cow fell through the roof.

In the second incident, a baby and a small child were sleeping next to the spot where the animal fell, in what was described at time as a miraculous escape.

Caratinga is in a hilly area of Minas Gerais, a Brazilian state traditionally known as a cattle raising and dairy producing region.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-23303998

cow

Demand for ‘Gomutra Arka’, a medicine distilled out of cow urine, is on the rise in Mangalore, India. An arka manufacturer on the outskirts of the city, who supplies around 10 litres a day, claims that even the educated are using the ayurvedic preparation regularly to prevent diseases.

Govanithashraya Trust manufactures gomutra arka at its goshala (cow shelter) in Beejaguri at Pajeer, 26 km from the city. Goshala in-charge Santhosh Kumar told TOI that they have plans to expand the manufacture unit as the demand for gomutra arka is increasing.

“We take care of more than 300 cows of various breeds. “Gomutra arka is effective in checking 109 types of diseases if consumed regularly as per the prescribed dosage. It increases resistance power, life span and purifies the blood, reduces cholesterol and checks obesity. It is also effective in skin diseases, acidity, kidney ailments and other diseases,” he claimed adding that even doctors use it routinely to prevent diseases.

Cow urine collected from local breeds like malenadu gidda, hallikaru and kankrej are used to make arka. “An average of 10 litres of arka is sold at our outlet in the city. There are other manufacturers, who also market arka in the city,” he added.

Santhosh underwent training in making organic products from panchagavyas (cow urine, cow dung, milk, ghee and curd) at a goshala in Devarapur in Nagpur. He makes medicines like gomootra arka, ghanvati, harde churna, kala taila, madhu meha churna, padasputana, goumaya taila, soundarya face pack, tooth powder, kapila bath soap and many other items using panchagavyas and medicinal herbs at the goshala. The products made at the goshala are sold through an outlet in the city.

http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2013-02-15/mangalore/37118603_1_cow-urine-cow-dung-cow-shelter

A Balinese teenager caught in the act of intercourse with a cow passed out on Friday when he was forced to marry the animal in a ceremony witnessed by hundreds of curious onlookers.  As the Jakarta Globe reported earlier in the day, Ngurah Alit, 18, an unemployed youth from the seaside village of Yeh Embang in Jembrana, was caught stark naked positioned behind the cow in a rice paddy field. In his defense, Alit admitted to the act of bestiality but claimed the cow, which he believed was a young and beautiful woman, had wooed him with flattering compliments. As part of a Pecaruan ritual, a ceremony to cleanse the village of the unholy act of a man mating with a cow, Alit was forced to “marry” the animal.  Alit, however, according to Detik.com, passed out surrounded by locals and police, who were attempting to prevent a number of journalists from covering the spectacle.  Alit’s collapse prompted his mother to begin screaming hysterically, while other family members shouted at photographers not to take pictures.  “Poor kid. He’s actually a quiet kid,” one villager said.  As part of the ceremony, Alit’s victim and new bride was drowned in ocean.  Alit, on the other hand, was symbolically drowned and bathed on the beach.  “Only his clothes were thrown into the sea,” the villager said.  Village chief Ida Bagus Legawa declared that the village had been “cleansed” from the “defilement from the incident.”

http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/national/teenager-passes-out-marrying-cow-he-had-sex-with/380095

 

The Kissinger kissing robot concept from Lovotics lets people virtually smooch with each other. Big silicone lips on each animal-shaped device register and replicate lip movements for long-distance affection.

Kissinger looks like a cross between a cow and a bunny. I know what you’re thinking. That sounds super sexy!

The bot sports some good-size lips. The idea is that you kiss away on your Kissinger and the touch-sensitive device sends the movements to another Kissinger far away. That Kissinger moves its own lips in response.

The lips are made from silicone and the kissing critter makes a sort of buzzing noise when it replicates a smooch.

So far, Kissinger is just lips, no tongue. The robot is in concept form, with no word on wider availability yet.

To summarize, two people each make out with sensitive cow/bunny robots and, therefore, actually make out with each other.

http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-57371948-1/kissinger-smooching-robot-for-virtual-make-out-sessions/

 

You cannot buy Japanese Kobe beef in this country. Not in stores, not by mail, and certainly not in restaurants. No matter how much you have spent, how fancy a steakhouse you went to, or which of the many celebrity chefs who regularly feature “Kobe beef” on their menus you believed, you were duped. If it wasn’t in Asia you almost certainly have never had Japan’s famous Kobe beef.

You may have had an imitation from the Midwest, Great Plains, South America or Australia, where they produce a lot of “Faux-be” beef. You may have even had a Kobe imposter from Japan before 2010. It is now illegal to import (or even hand carry for personal consumption) any Japanese beef. Before 2010 you could import only boneless fresh Japanese beef, but none was real Kobe. Under Japanese law, Kobe beef can only came from Hyogo prefecture (of which Kobe is the capital city), where no slaughterhouses were approved for export by the USDA. According to its own trade group, the Kobe Beef Marketing & Distribution Promotion Association in Japan, where Kobe Beef is a registered trademark, Macao is the only place it is exported to – and only since last year. If you had real Kobe beef in this country in recent years, someone probably smuggled it in their luggage.

“How is this possible?” you ask, when you see the virtues of Kobe being touted on television food shows, by famous chefs, and on menus all over the country? A dozen burger joints in Las Vegas alone offer Kobe burgers. Google it and you will find dozens of online vendors happy to take your money and ship you very pricey steaks. Restaurant reviews in the New York Times have repeatedly praised the “Kobe beef” served at high-end Manhattan restaurants. Not an issue of any major food magazine goes by without reinforcing the great fat Kobe beef lie.

Despite the fact that Kobe Beef, as well as Kobe Meat and Kobe Cattle, are patented terms and/or trademarks in Japan, these are neither recognized nor protected by U.S. law. As far as regulators here are concerned, Kobe beef, unlike say Florida Orange Juice, means almost nothing (the “beef” part should still come from cows). Like the recent surge in the use of the unregulated label term “natural,” it is an adjective used mainly to confuse consumers and profit from that confusion.

This matters because the reason food lovers and expense account diners want Kobe beef, and are willing to pay a huge premium for it, is because of the real Kobe’s longstanding reputation for excellence. The con the US food industry is running is leading you to believe that what you are paying huge dollars for – like the $40 NYC “Kobe” burger – is somehow linked to this heritage of excellence. It’s not.

Real Kobe beef is produced under some of the world’s strictest legal food standards, whereas “domestic Kobe” beef production, along with that in Australia and South America, is as regulated as the Wild West. In Japan, to be Kobe requires a pure lineage of Tajima-gyu breed cattle (not any old Japanese breed crossbred with American cattle as is the norm here). The animal must also have been born in Hyogo prefecture and thus raised on the local grasses and water and terroir its entire life. It must be a bull or virgin cow, and it takes considerably longer to raise a Tajima-gyu for consumption than most other breeds, adding to the cost. It must be processed in a Hyogo slaughterhouse – none of which export to the US – and then pass a strict government grading exam. There are only 3000 head of certified Kobe Beef cattle in the world, and none are outside Japan. The process is so strict that when the beef is sold, either in stores or restaurants, it must carry the 10-digit identification number so customers know what particular Tajima-gyu cow it came from.

In contrast, when you order “Kobe beef” here, you usually can’t even tell what kind of cow it came from – or where. Or what makes it “Kobe.”

The bottom line is that the only reason there is beef called Kobe beef sold in this country is because our government lets vendors call a lot of things Kobe beef. But the reason consumers buy it is because the cattle industry in Kobe spent lifetimes building a reputation for excellence, a reputation that has essentially been stolen.

There are two different parts to the broad misuse of the Kobe name. Historically in the US, restaurants and distributors have generically termed virtually any beef from anywhere in Japan Kobe, and many high-end restaurants did once get beef from Japan, and put it on the menus as Kobe, though it was not true Kobe beef. But in the past two years there has been no Japanese beef here. So the term Kobe today has even less meaning, and the meat can come from many different countries and have nothing in common with actual Kobe beef except that it comes from cows.  The argument often broached by the food industry that this non-Japanese Kobe is some sort of recreation of the real thing from the same breed of cows is also largely a myth.

Read about it in the USDA’s own words, about how as of early 2010 all beef from Japan including that “normally referred to as Kobe beef,” will “be refused entry,” “including in passenger luggage.” This is still the case, as you can see in the most recent Animal Product Manual, produced by the USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), dated March 1, 2012 which specifically states that beef from Japan, fresh or frozen, whole or cut, bone-in or boneless, will be “Refused Entry.”

It is impossible to say exactly what you are getting in your Faux-be slider, or $100 Faux-be strip, but one thing is certain – it is not Japanese Kobe beef.  For the past two years, it has not been any kind of Japanese beef at all.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/larryolmsted/2012/04/12/foods-biggest-scam-the-great-kobe-beef-lie/

A group of stray cows that froze to death in the Colorado mountains must be blown up or set on fire to avoid water contamination, forestry officials say.

The carcasses were discovered near the Conundrum Hot Springs in Aspen by two Air Force Academy cadets in late March.

The cows were found in a ranger cabin where it is thought they wandered during a snowstorm after they were separated from the herd last year.

The plan is to remove the dead animals before they begin to thaw.

US Forest Service spokesman Steve Segin told the BBC: “Obviously, time is of the essence because we don’t want them defrosting.”

He told the BBC that “negative interactions” with other wildlife were also a concern.

Winter temperatures in the area regularly drop to below 0F (-18C).

The hot springs are inside a federal wilderness area high in the Rocky Mountains, which prevents mechanical options, like chainsaws, from being used.

The options include letting the cows decompose and closing off the area, setting off explosives to break up the animals and speed up the decomposition process, or setting the cabin on fire.

Officials say there are about six cows inside the cabin and several just outside.

Michael Carroll, a spokesman for the Wilderness Society in Colorado, told the Associated Press: “They need to use the minimal tool to get the job done.

“They don’t want to leave the land scarred.”

According to Mr Segin, the cows’ owner has been found through the tags on the animals.

Cows and other animals are allowed to graze on federal wilderness land if the owner has a permit.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-17750245