SCIENTISTS DISCOVER EVIDENCE OF THE FIRST LARGE BODY OF LIQUID WATER ON MARS

FOR DECADES MARS has teased scientists with whispers of water’s presence. Valleys and basins and rivers long dry point to the planet’s hydrous past. The accumulation of condensation on surface landers and the detection of vast subterranean ice deposits suggest the stuff still lingers in gaseous and solid states. But liquid water has proved moreContinue reading “SCIENTISTS DISCOVER EVIDENCE OF THE FIRST LARGE BODY OF LIQUID WATER ON MARS”

Graphene filters economically and effectively generate clean water by removing chemicals, solutes, salts and pesticides

by Jane Bird New approaches to filtration and extracting moisture from air promise to alleviate the world’s looming water scarcity crisis. Filtration is being transformed by thin sheets of graphene, a carbon-based material invented in 2004 at Manchester University. Rahul Raveendran Nair, the university’s professor of materials physics, says graphene has the potential to deliver largeContinue reading “Graphene filters economically and effectively generate clean water by removing chemicals, solutes, salts and pesticides”

Interstellar object may hold ‘alien’ water

By Paul Rincon The first known interstellar asteroid may hold water from another star system in its interior, according to a study. Discovered on 19 October, the object’s speed and trajectory strongly suggested it originated beyond our Solar System. The body showed no signs of “outgassing” as it approached the Sun, strengthening the idea thatContinue reading “Interstellar object may hold ‘alien’ water”

Scientists discover a sixth sense on the tongue—for water

By Emily Underwood Viewed under a microscope, your tongue is an alien landscape, studded by fringed and bumpy buds that sense five basic tastes: salty, sour, sweet, bitter, and umami. But mammalian taste buds may have an additional sixth sense—for water, a new study suggests. The finding could help explain how animals can tell waterContinue reading “Scientists discover a sixth sense on the tongue—for water”

New Device Uses Solar Energy to Pull Drinking Water from the Air

by David Z. Morris A new device, developed by researchers at UC Berkeley and MIT, promises to bring clean drinking water to remote areas by drawing it directly from the air. Though the device is currently only a prototype, its early results appear extremely promising. The device, which calls to mind the “moisture vaporators” LukeContinue reading “New Device Uses Solar Energy to Pull Drinking Water from the Air”

Harvesting fog to make water

Peña Blanca is a small agricultural community 300 km north of Santiago. In this arid coastal region, ‘fog catchers’ — large nets strung up in areas with thick fog and high winds — are used to collect water. The technique was pioneered in Chile in the 1950s. The fog is pushed through fine mesh whereContinue reading “Harvesting fog to make water”

Thailand tribe children who see with perfect clarity underwater

By Helen Thomson “When the tide came in, these kids started swimming. But not like I had seen before. They were more underwater than above water, they had their eyes wide open – they were like little dolphins.” Deep in the island archipelagos on the Andaman Sea, and along the west coast of Thailand liveContinue reading “Thailand tribe children who see with perfect clarity underwater”

New way to generate electric power from seawater

Scientists have successfully developed a method of producing electricity from seawater, with help from the Sun. Instead of harvesting hydrogen, the new photoelectrochemical cell produces hydrogen peroxide for electricity. Researchers at Osaka University found a way to turn seawater—one of the most abundant resources on Earth—into hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) using sunlight, which can then beContinue reading “New way to generate electric power from seawater”

New irrigation methods mean veggies and fruits serve up used pharmaceuticals

Through vegetables and fruits, the drugs that we flush down the drain are returning to us. In a randomized, single-blind pilot study, researchers found that anticonvulsive epilepsy drug carbamazepine, which is released in urine, can accumulate in crops irrigated with recycled water—treated sewage—and end up in the urine of produce-eaters not on the drugs. TheContinue reading “New irrigation methods mean veggies and fruits serve up used pharmaceuticals”

Jupiter’s Moon Ganymede Has a Salty Ocean with More Water Than Earth

The ocean there is thought to extend to 10 times the depth of Earth’s oceans. A salty ocean is lurking beneath the surface of Jupiter’s largest moon, Ganymede, scientists using the Hubble Space Telescope have found. The ocean on Ganymede—which is buried under a thick crust of ice—could actually harbor more water than all ofContinue reading “Jupiter’s Moon Ganymede Has a Salty Ocean with More Water Than Earth”