This already prescribed drug may also effectively treat patients infected with Ebola.

by Jennifer Brown The recent Ebola outbreak in West Africa has claimed more than 11,300 lives—a stark reminder of the lack of effective options for treating or preventing the disease. Progress has been made on developing vaccines, but there is still a need for antiviral therapies to protect health care workers and local populations inContinue reading “This already prescribed drug may also effectively treat patients infected with Ebola.”

Exploring the Biology of Eating Disorders

With the pressure for a certain body type prevalent in the media, eating disorders are on the rise. But these diseases are not completely socially driven; researchers have uncovered important genetic and biological components as well and are now beginning to tease out the genes and pathways responsible for eating disorder predisposition and pathology. AsContinue reading “Exploring the Biology of Eating Disorders”

New research shows that high salt diet suppresses weight gain in mice on a high fat diet

Dr. Justin Grobe, PhD Dr. Michael Lutter, MD PhD In a study that seems to defy conventional dietary wisdom, University of Iowa scientists have found that adding high salt to a high-fat diet actually prevents weight gain in mice. As exciting as this may sound to fast food lovers, the researchers caution that very highContinue reading “New research shows that high salt diet suppresses weight gain in mice on a high fat diet”

Scientists manage to give mice ‘eating disorders’ by knocking out one gene

By Rachel Feltman If you give a mouse an eating disorder, you might just figure out how to treat the disease in humans. In a new study published Thursday in Cell Press, researchers created mice who lacked a gene associated with disordered eating in humans. Without it, the mice showed behaviors not unlike those seenContinue reading “Scientists manage to give mice ‘eating disorders’ by knocking out one gene”

New research identifies similarity between how pigeons and human children learn equivalent of words

The more scientists study pigeons, the more they learn how their brains—no bigger than the tip of an index finger—operate in ways not so different from our own. In a new study from the University of Iowa, researchers found that pigeons can categorize and name both natural and manmade objects—and not just a few objects.Continue reading “New research identifies similarity between how pigeons and human children learn equivalent of words”