Paralyzed man walks using brain-controlled robotic suit

A tetraplegic man has been able to move all four of his paralyzed limbs by using a brain-controlled robotic suit, researchers have said. The 28-year-old man from Lyon, France, known as Thibault, was paralyzed from the shoulders down after falling 40 feet from a balcony, severing his spinal cord, the AFP news agency reported. HeContinue reading “Paralyzed man walks using brain-controlled robotic suit”

Electric tech could help reverse baldness simply by wearing a hat

Reversing baldness could someday be as easy as wearing a hat, thanks to a noninvasive, low-cost hair-growth-stimulating technology developed by engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. “I think this will be a very practical solution to hair regeneration,” says Xudong Wang, a professor of materials science and engineering at UW-Madison. Wang and colleagues published aContinue reading “Electric tech could help reverse baldness simply by wearing a hat”

Biohackers are pirating a cheap version of a million-dollar Glybera gene therapy

A group of independent biologists say they plan to copy a costly gene therapy. Are they medicine’s Robin Hood or a threat to safety? by Alex Pearlman Citing the tremendous cost of new drugs, an international group of biohackers say they are creating a knock-off of a million-dollar gene therapy. The drug being copied isContinue reading “Biohackers are pirating a cheap version of a million-dollar Glybera gene therapy”

Chemists make first-ever ring of pure 18-atom ‘cyclocarbon’ that could be a step towards molecule-scale transistors

by Davide Castelvecchi Long after most chemists had given up trying, a team of researchers has synthesized the first ring-shaped molecule of pure carbon — a circle of 18 atoms. The chemists started with a triangular molecule of carbon and oxygen, which they manipulated with electric currents to create the carbon-18 ring. Initial studies ofContinue reading “Chemists make first-ever ring of pure 18-atom ‘cyclocarbon’ that could be a step towards molecule-scale transistors”

First sun-dimming experiment will test a way to cool Earth

Frank Keutsch, Zhen Dai and David Keith (left to right) in Keutsch’s laboratory at Harvard University. Zhen Dai holds up a small glass tube coated with a white powder: calcium carbonate, a ubiquitous compound used in everything from paper and cement to toothpaste and cake mixes. Plop a tablet of it into water, and theContinue reading “First sun-dimming experiment will test a way to cool Earth”

Prosthetics can sense touch with ‘electronic skin’ invention

Users of prosthetic limbs could soon be able to feel sensation on them, thanks to an “electronic skin” (e-skin) invented by researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS). The artificial nervous system can detect touch more than 1,000 times faster than the human equivalent and is the first e-skin in the world to doContinue reading “Prosthetics can sense touch with ‘electronic skin’ invention”

The Pentagon has a laser that can identify people from at least 200 meters away by the pattern of their heartbeat.

by David Hambling Everyone’s heart is different. Like the iris or fingerprint, our unique cardiac signature can be used as a way to tell us apart. Crucially, it can be done from a distance. It’s that last point that has intrigued US Special Forces. Other long-range biometric techniques include gait analysis, which identifies someone byContinue reading “The Pentagon has a laser that can identify people from at least 200 meters away by the pattern of their heartbeat.”

A new 3-D printed ‘sponge’ sops up excess chemo drugs

Bringing the filtering abilities of a fuel cell into the blood vessels of living organisms, a new device could cut down on toxic effects of cancer treatment. At the heart of this approach — recently tested in pigs — is a tiny, cylindrical “sponge” created by 3-D printing. Wedged inside a vein near a tumorContinue reading “A new 3-D printed ‘sponge’ sops up excess chemo drugs”

The smartphone app that can tell you’re depressed before you know it yourself

by Rachel Metz There are about 45 million people in the US alone with a mental illness, and those illnesses and their courses of treatment can vary tremendously. But there is something most of those people have in common: a smartphone. A startup founded in Palo Alto, California, by a trio of doctors, including theContinue reading “The smartphone app that can tell you’re depressed before you know it yourself”

New Hearing Aid Includes Fitness Tracking, Language Translation

Starkey Hearing Technologies recently unveiled their latest hearing aid, the Livio AI. The aid leverages artificially intelligent software to adapt to users’ listening environments. Starkey says the device does a lot more than just assist in hearing, and includes a range of additional technology, such as a physical activity tracker and integrated language translation. HearingContinue reading “New Hearing Aid Includes Fitness Tracking, Language Translation”