Humanity tested

Humanity tested Nature Biomedical Engineering (2020)Cite this article 10 Altmetric Metricsdetails The world needs mass at-home serological testing for antibodies elicited by SARS-CoV-2, and rapid and frequent point-of-care testing for the presence of the virus’ RNA in selected populations. How did we end up here? Two ways. Gradually, then suddenly. Ernest Hemingway’s passage is aContinue reading “Humanity tested”

Eating too much salt seems to impair body’s ability to fight bacteria

By Michael Le Page Eating too much salt may impair the body’s ability to fight bacterial infections, according to studies in mice and in 10 human volunteers. Christian Kurts at the University Hospital of Bonn in Germany and his team first showed that mice given a high salt diet were less able to fight kidneyContinue reading “Eating too much salt seems to impair body’s ability to fight bacteria”

New evidence that p gingivalis may be a main culprit in Alzheimer’s disease

by Debora MacKenzie We may finally have found a long-elusive cause of Alzheimer’s disease: Porphyromonas gingivalis, the key bacteria in chronic gum disease. That’s bad, as gum disease affects around a third of all people. But the good news is that a drug that blocks the main toxins of P. gingivalis is entering major clinicalContinue reading “New evidence that p gingivalis may be a main culprit in Alzheimer’s disease”

Case Western Reserve researchers cure drug-resistant infections without antibiotics

Case Western Reserve researchers cure drug-resistant infections without antibiotics Biochemists, microbiologists, drug discovery experts and infectious disease doctors have teamed up in a new study that shows antibiotics are not always necessary to cure sepsis in mice. Instead of killing causative bacteria with antibiotics, researchers treated infected mice with molecules that block toxin formation inContinue reading “Case Western Reserve researchers cure drug-resistant infections without antibiotics”

Dominant male mammals are particularly at risk of infection by parasites

By Richard Kemeny According to much of the scientific literature, dominance in social animals goes hand-in-hand with healthier lives. Yet leaders of the pack might not be healthier in all aspects, and according to a study published last week (February 26) in Scientific Reports, they are more at risk of parasite infection. “While high-ranking animalsContinue reading “Dominant male mammals are particularly at risk of infection by parasites”

This already prescribed drug may also effectively treat patients infected with Ebola.

by Jennifer Brown The recent Ebola outbreak in West Africa has claimed more than 11,300 lives—a stark reminder of the lack of effective options for treating or preventing the disease. Progress has been made on developing vaccines, but there is still a need for antiviral therapies to protect health care workers and local populations inContinue reading “This already prescribed drug may also effectively treat patients infected with Ebola.”

Art informing science: possible medieval remedy for modern day superbugs?

A one thousand year old Anglo-Saxon remedy for eye infections which originates from a manuscript in the British Library has been found to kill the modern-day superbug MRSA in an unusual research collaboration at The University of Nottingham. Dr Christina Lee, an Anglo-Saxon expert from the School of English has enlisted the help of microbiologistsContinue reading “Art informing science: possible medieval remedy for modern day superbugs?”

7 Very Bizarre (and Very Rare) Psychotic Hallucinations

brain The many documented cases of strange delusions and neurological syndromes can offer a window into how bizarre the brain can be. It may seem that hallucinations are random images that appear to some individuals, or that delusions are thoughts that arise without purpose. However, in some cases, a specific brain pathway may create aContinue reading “7 Very Bizarre (and Very Rare) Psychotic Hallucinations”