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In a speech a few weeks ago at Durham Academy, his high-school alma mater, Chris Rosati told students about a sweet dream of his.

He wanted to hijack a Krispy Kreme doughnut delivery truck and, with the cops chasing him, drive around tossing out free confections and cheer. Robin Hood, with baked goods.

The normally jaded teens embraced the idea with such enthusiasm that Rosati – already inclined to mischief – became determined to make it happen.

But every successful dreamer is also a realist, and Rosati knew his chances of getting away with a loaded doughnut truck were pretty slim, especially since he was diagnosed three years ago with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. He can still walk, with assistance, but the degenerative neuromuscular disorder, which is ultimately fatal, has slowed him down.

He would need some help.

Rosati, a self-employed marketing consultant, knew what to do. He set up a Facebook page called A Krispy Kreme Heist, where he described his plan. He solicited “likes,” in the hopes that eventually, Winston-Salem-based Krispy Kreme would hear about it, lend him a truck and driver, and give him some doughnuts to give away.

Since he got sick, he explained, “I’m more open than ever to chasing my dreams … even odd ones like this.”

His story traveled like the scent of Original Glazed hot off the line. Within eight hours, Krispy Kreme corporate officials heard about Rosati’s idea.

“We got in touch with Chris and told him, ‘Don’t steal one of our trucks,’” said Megan Brock, directer of marketing. “We’ll give you the Krispy Kreme Cruiser and a thousand doughnuts.”

The Cruiser is a 1960 Flexible Starliner bus restored and christened last year for the company’s 75th anniversary. Krispy Kreme likes to say it’s one sweet ride that travels the country for promotional events.

Tuesday, its route was chosen by Rosati, who had the driver go to Duke University Medical Center, where he visited a cancer treatment center, a bone marrow transplant facility and the clinic where he gets treatment for his ALS.

After that, it was on to Durham Academy, where 400 high-schoolers had been assembled on the sidewalk without knowing why.

They figured it out when the Cruiser rolled into the parking lot, with its trademark green polka dots and Krispy Kreme bow-tie logo. They screamed and hooted.

“I told y’all to live out your dreams, as dumb as they may be sometimes,” he told the students as he got off the bus.

They would each get a doughnut, he promised, but then he asked a favor. Would some of them take a box, go out into the community and give them away just to see people smile?

“You get 12 chances in that box to make somebody happy,” he said.

Rosati’s wife, Anna, said the couple would use video of the day’s events to inspire others toward random acts of kindness through Rosati’s nonprofit, called Inspire MEdia. Eventually, Anna Rosati said, the couple hope the foundation will be able to help people fund their own uplifting projects.

http://www.journalnow.com/news/state_region/article_8a8f4da8-5fb0-11e3-ad14-001a4bcf6878.html

Thanks to Dr. Goldman for bringing this to the It’s Interesting community.

EL PASO, Texas — Coach Peter Morales of the Coronado High School Thunderbirds in El Paso, Texas, makes no qualms about it: he has a favorite on this team. Team manager Mitchell Marcus has a developmental disability, but he far surpasses everyone here when it comes to love of the game. “He’s just an amazing person that our basketball team loves being around,” Morales says.

Mitchell’s mom, Amy, says he’s always been that way. “Mitchell always had a basketball, that was always what he wanted for his birthday,” she says.

And because basketball is that important to him, on the last game of the regular season, the coach told Mitchell to suit up.

“I was very happy,” Mitchell says of what it was like to put on the team’s uniform.

Just wearing a jersey was enough for Mitchell, but what he didn’t know — what no one knew at the time — was that the coach planned to play him at the end, no matter what the score. Morales says he was prepared to lose the game. “For his moment in time, yes,” he says.

With a minute-and-a-half left — Coronado leading, but only by 10 — Coach Morales put in his manager. “And I just started hearing, ‘Mitchell, Mitchell,'” Morales says.

But here’s where the fairytale fell apart. Although his teammates did everything they could to get Mitchell a basket, each time they passed him the ball, he either missed the shot, or, like on their last possession, booted it out of bounds, turning the ball over to the other team with just seconds left. “He wasn’t going to be able to score, but I was hoping that he was happy that he was just put in the game,” Morales says. He couldn’t have imagined what happened next.

What happened occurred on the inbound. The guy with the ball was a senior at Franklin High School, Number 22, Jonathon Montanez. “I was raised to treat others how you want to be treated,” Jonathon says. “I just though Mitchell deserved his chance, deserved his opportunity.”

“I think I’ll cry about it for the rest of my life,” Amy says.

What Jonathon did was yell out Mitchell’s name, then threw the ball right to him — one of the most memorable turnovers of all time. It wasn’t the game-winning shot. When the buzzer sounded, Coronado had 15 more points than Franklin. But Jonathon’s assist and Mitchell’s basket did change the outcome decidedly. Play any game with this much sportsmanship and both teams win.

Thanks, to the future Dr. Goldman, for bringing this to the attention of the It’s Interesting community.

And congratulations to the future Dr. Goldman on induction into Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society!
Way to go!

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Thanks to Dr. Goldman for bringing this to the attention of the It’s Interesting community.

After surviving a near-fatal car accident, Kaitlin Hunter found herself battling a devastating bacterial infection in her colon that also threatened her life.

The persistent infection was beaten through a little-known technique involving the transplant of fecal matter from Hunter’s mother, which put healthy bacteria back into her colon.

Following the July procedure, “I’ve been so happy,” said Hunter, 20, of Marietta, Georgia. “I’m cured.”

Her struggle began more than a year earlier when she was released from a hospital in Sacramento, California.

A June 2011 car accident fractured her lower spine, lacerated her liver and colon, and broke all 10 toes. Emergency crews used the Jaws of Life to cut Hunter from her dad’s car, and then she was flown to the hospital, where she spent the next month.

Upon her release, Hunter flew home to Georgia. It hadn’t been the summer vacation she imagined, but she thought she was getting better.

But “right when I got off the plane, I went to the hospital. I was having extremely bad stomach pain. A month later, we found out it was C. diff,” Hunter said, using the abbreviation for the bacteria clostridium difficile.

How it began

In the hospital after her accident, doctors followed standard care and put Hunter on antibiotics to prevent an infection.

In spite of the antibiotics — or possibly because of them — C. diff infected her colon, causing severe stomach pain, diarrhea and vomiting.

Hunter, who stands 5 feet 7 inches tall, lost 40 pounds during her struggle. Her weight plummeted to 85 pounds.

It’s believed that antibiotics, which kill harmful infection-causing bacteria, also weaken the beneficial, healthy bacteria percolating in the colon. With the colon’s defenses down, C. diff grows rampant, releasing a toxin and inflaming the colon.

C. diff infections kill about 14,000 people in the United States every year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the number and severity of total cases have increased dramatically over the past decade.

Experts: Alcohol enemas ‘extremely dangerous’

Even though antibiotics put someone at risk of developing a C. diff infection, standard treatment still calls for prescribing more and different antibiotics to kill the C. diff and allow healthy bacteria to recolonize.

But for many people such as Hunter — who went through nine rounds of antibiotic treatments — the healthy bacteria never get the upper hand, and the C. diff just keeps coming back.

‘Brand-new’ treatment

Increasingly, doctors are taking a different approach. Instead of continued assaults on bacteria, “fecal matter transplants” recolonize the colon with new bacteria from a healthy donor.

“This is brand-new for most gastroenterologists,” said Dr. Suku George, Hunter’s treating physician. “We are very excited about this.”

George had never deposited fecal matter by colonoscopy into a patient until Hunter wanted to try it.

Hunter’s mother “donated” one of her stools for the procedure. Next, the hospital lab carefully diluted it, and George pumped the foreign fecal matter right into Hunter’s colon.

The result ended Hunter’s struggle with C. diff.

A study published in March reported a 91% cure rate after just one fecal matter transplant, and a 98% cure rate when combined with an additional round of antibiotics.

Remarkably, that study only included the sickest of patients. All 77 of the study participants already had a recurring C. diff infection, having tried and failed five rounds of antibiotic-only treatments over 11 months, on average.

The study used the colonoscopy method, which many believe is the most effective, because relatively large amounts of fecal matter can be placed deep inside the colon.

Other methods use either an enema or a nasogastric tube, which sends fecal matter through the nasal passage, down the throat and into the stomach.

Why polio hasn’t gone away yet

George tried the nasogastric tube on Hunter, using fecal material from her father, but the C. diff infection returned. He then asked for and received permission to perform the hospital’s first colonoscopic fecal transplant.

Looking ahead

Gastroenterologists pioneering the practice unanimously seem to agree that eventually a cleaner, commercially developed suppository will replace the crude feces and water mixtures currently in use.

“It’ll become a little more acceptable to hospitals and patients and more widely performed,” said Dr. Lawrence Brandt, a professor of medicine and surgery at New York’s Albert Einstein College of Medicine who was the lead author on the March study.”But for people that have recurring C. diff, it doesn’t really much matter, because these patients are so ill and so much want to get better. The fact that it’s stool, it doesn’t matter to them.”

To enroll in a fecal transplant study, visit clinicaltrials.gov.

Thanks to the future Dr. Goldman for bringing this to the attention of the It’s Interesting community.