Regeneron and Sanofi speed Kevzara into coronavirus trials

Dive Brief: Rheumatoid arthritis drug Kevzara will be used in an international study of patients infected with the new coronavirus and suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and Sanofi announced Monday. The trial will kick off in disease hotspot New York City, expanding to a total of 16 U.S. sites and enrolling 400Continue reading “Regeneron and Sanofi speed Kevzara into coronavirus trials”

The antimicrobial compounds ants excrete to defend themselves from pathogens may protect plants as well.

by Emily Makowski Some ants produce natural antibiotic chemicals to defend themselves against fungi and bacteria. Ecologist Joachim Offenberg of Aarhus University in Denmark wondered what effect these compounds had on the health of the plants the ants called home. “We had this thought that if ants produce antibiotics, maybe these antibiotics could have anContinue reading “The antimicrobial compounds ants excrete to defend themselves from pathogens may protect plants as well.”

Second person cured of HIV is still free of active virus two years on

Adam Castillejo, known in the scientific literature as the London Patient, in London’s East End, March 1, 2020. By Gina Yu and Amy Woodyatt he second person ever to be cured of HIV is still free of active virus more than two years on, a study published by medical journal The Lancet HIV revealed onContinue reading “Second person cured of HIV is still free of active virus two years on”

If you drive an expensive car you’re probably a jerk, scientists say

By Rob Picheta The science is looking pretty unanimous on this one: Drivers of expensive cars are the worst. A new study has found that drivers of flashy vehicles are less likely to stop and allow pedestrians to cross the road — with the likelihood they’ll slow down decreasing by 3% for every extra $1,000Continue reading “If you drive an expensive car you’re probably a jerk, scientists say”

Philip Leder, Who Deciphered Amino Acid Sequences, Dies

The Harvard Medical School researcher’s work on the genetic basis of protein coding and production led him to make groundbreaking discoveries in immunology, molecular biology, and cancer genetics. by ASHLEY YEAGER Harvard Medical School molecular geneticist Philip Leder died last week (February 2). He was 85. Leder was revered for his work in molecular biology,Continue reading “Philip Leder, Who Deciphered Amino Acid Sequences, Dies”

Ecuadorian Cactus Absorbs Ultrasound, Enticing Bats to Flowers

by EMILY MAKOWSKI Plants pollinated by nectar-drinking bats often have flowers that reflect ultrasonic waves, making it easier for the animals to locate flowers through echolocation. But one cactus does the opposite—it absorbs more ultrasound in the area surrounding its flowers, making them stand out against a “quieter” background, according to a preprint published onContinue reading “Ecuadorian Cactus Absorbs Ultrasound, Enticing Bats to Flowers”

Robert Moir, 58, Dies; His Research Changed Views on Alzheimer’s disease

Dr. Moir’s radical and iconoclastic theories defied conventional views of the disease. But some scientists were ultimately won over. By Gina Kolata Robert D. Moir, a Harvard scientist whose radical theories of the brain plaques in Alzheimer’s defied conventional views of the disease, but whose research ultimately led to important proposals for how to treatContinue reading “Robert Moir, 58, Dies; His Research Changed Views on Alzheimer’s disease”

Bounding and Galloping crocodiles

Even on land, crocodiles are no fish out of water. While these reptiles might look lazy and slow sunning on the bank, they can easily pick up speed when necessary, and a scary number can gallop or bound like a horse or a dog. Bounding is when an animal’s forelimbs hit the ground at theContinue reading “Bounding and Galloping crocodiles”

Presidential executive order to allow free access of publicly-funded scientific research is under consideration.

White House officials are working on an executive order that would boost public access to federally funded research, prompting publishers to panic about the future of their business models, according to people familiar with the plan. Ostensibly, the order would follow longtime bipartisan interest in improving public access to research that is paid for byContinue reading “Presidential executive order to allow free access of publicly-funded scientific research is under consideration.”

Pig-Monkey Hybrid Engineered in China

This piglet had some cells from a monkey but died within a week of birth Tang Hai By Michael Le Page Pig-primate chimeras have been born live for the first time but died within a week. The two piglets, created by a team in China, looked normal although a small proportion of their cells wereContinue reading “Pig-Monkey Hybrid Engineered in China”