Robert Moir, 58, Dies; His Research Changed Views on Alzheimer’s disease

Dr. Moir’s radical and iconoclastic theories defied conventional views of the disease. But some scientists were ultimately won over. By Gina Kolata Robert D. Moir, a Harvard scientist whose radical theories of the brain plaques in Alzheimer’s defied conventional views of the disease, but whose research ultimately led to important proposals for how to treatContinue reading “Robert Moir, 58, Dies; His Research Changed Views on Alzheimer’s disease”

Presidential executive order to allow free access of publicly-funded scientific research is under consideration.

White House officials are working on an executive order that would boost public access to federally funded research, prompting publishers to panic about the future of their business models, according to people familiar with the plan. Ostensibly, the order would follow longtime bipartisan interest in improving public access to research that is paid for byContinue reading “Presidential executive order to allow free access of publicly-funded scientific research is under consideration.”

Life-long strategies that may help decrease the risk of developing dementia

There are no instant, miracle cures. But recent studies suggest we have more control over our cognitive health than we might think. It just takes some effort. When it comes to battling dementia, the unfortunate news is this: Medications have proven ineffective at curing or stopping the disease and its most common form, Alzheimer’s disease.Continue reading “Life-long strategies that may help decrease the risk of developing dementia”

Scientists may have now worked out why we hiccup

By Rory Sullivan Although hiccups seem a nuisance, scientists have discovered they may play a crucial role in our development — by helping babies to regulate their breathing. In a study led by University College London (UCL), researchers monitoring 13 newborn babies found that hiccupping triggered a large wave of brain signals which could aidContinue reading “Scientists may have now worked out why we hiccup”

China approves 1st new drug for Alzheimer’s disease in 17 years

By Julie Zaugg and Jared Peng Authorities in China have approved a drug for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, the first new medicine with the potential to treat the cognitive disorder in 17 years. The seaweed-based drug, called Oligomannate, can be used for the treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer’s, according to a statement fromContinue reading “China approves 1st new drug for Alzheimer’s disease in 17 years”

Scientists concerned US environment agency’s plan to limit animal research will hamper chemical research and regulations

Laboratory animals such as mice are an important part of chemical safety tests, say researchers by Jeff Tollefson The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is trying to sharply reduce its use of animals in toxicity tests. Many scientists and environmentalists say the move is premature and could undermine chemical regulation. In a memo to staff,Continue reading “Scientists concerned US environment agency’s plan to limit animal research will hamper chemical research and regulations”

A newly identified type of dementia that is sometimes mistaken for Alzheimer’s disease

Doctors have newly outlined a type of dementia that could be more common than Alzheimer’s among the oldest adults, according to a report published Tuesday in the journal Brain. The disease, called LATE, may often mirror the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease, though it affects the brain differently and develops more slowly than Alzheimer’s. Doctors sayContinue reading “A newly identified type of dementia that is sometimes mistaken for Alzheimer’s disease”

Artificial intelligence singles out neurons faster than a human can

Two-photon imaging shows neurons firing in a mouse brain. Recordings like this enable researchers to track which neurons are firing, and how they potentially correspond to different behaviors. The image is credited to Yiyang Gong, Duke University. Summary: Convolutional neural network model significantly outperforms previous methods and is as accurate as humans in segmenting activeContinue reading “Artificial intelligence singles out neurons faster than a human can”

New neurons for life? Old people can still make fresh brain cells, study finds

By Emily Underwood One of the thorniest debates in neuroscience is whether people can make new neurons after their brains stop developing in adolescence—a process known as neurogenesis. Now, a new study finds that even people long past middle age can make fresh brain cells, and that past studies that failed to spot these newcomersContinue reading “New neurons for life? Old people can still make fresh brain cells, study finds”

Scientists Identify The Location of ‘Taste’ in Your Head, And It’s Not The Tongue

by David Nield How exactly do our brains sort between the five taste groups: sweet, sour, salty, bitter and umami? We’ve now got a much better idea, thanks to research that has pinned down where in the brain this taste processing happens. Step forward: the insular cortex. Already thought to be responsible for everything fromContinue reading “Scientists Identify The Location of ‘Taste’ in Your Head, And It’s Not The Tongue”