Male researchers’ ‘vague’ language more likely to win grants

by Holly Else Grant reviewers award lower scores to proposals from women than to those from men, even when they don’t know the gender of the applicant, an analysis of thousands of submissions to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has found (1). That’s because male and female scientists use different types of word onContinue reading “Male researchers’ ‘vague’ language more likely to win grants”

Peer-reviewed scientific grants are more likely to be funded when applicants are allowed to suggest reviewers

Peer reviewers are four times more likely to give a grant application an “excellent” or “outstanding” score rather than a “poor” or “good” one when they are chosen by the grant’s applicants, an analysis of Swiss funding applications has found. The study, at the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF), was completed in 2016, and theContinue reading “Peer-reviewed scientific grants are more likely to be funded when applicants are allowed to suggest reviewers”

Why the Medical Research Grant System Could Be Costing Us Great Ideas

By Aaron E. Carroll The medical research grant system in the United States, run through the National Institutes of Health, is intended to fund work that spurs innovation and fosters research careers. In many ways, it may be failing. It has been getting harder for researchers to obtain grant support. A study published in 2015Continue reading “Why the Medical Research Grant System Could Be Costing Us Great Ideas”

Neuroscientist Says NIH Funding Squeeze Causing ‘Crisis’ in Biomedical Enterprise

By Jeannie Baumann Many scientists now spend more time scrambling to raise money for their work than actually doing the research because of the erosion of NIH funding over the last decade, the president of a biomedical research university said during a June 18 congressional briefing. Mark Tessier-Lavigne said the 25 percent decline in theContinue reading “Neuroscientist Says NIH Funding Squeeze Causing ‘Crisis’ in Biomedical Enterprise”