Vitamin D may improve sunburn, according to new clinical trial

High doses of vitamin D taken one hour after sunburn significantly reduce skin redness, swelling, and inflammation, according to double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center. The trial results were recently published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology.

In the study, 20 participants were randomized to receive a placebo pill or 50,000, 100,000, or 200,000 IU of vitamin D one hour after a small UV lamp “sunburn” on their inner arm. Researchers followed up with the participants 24, 48, 72 hours and 1 week after the experiment and collected skin biopsies for further testing. Participants who consumed the highest doses of vitamin D had long-lasting benefits — including less skin inflammation 48 hours after the burn. Participants with the highest blood levels of vitamin D also had less skin redness and a jump in gene activity related to skin barrier repair.

“We found benefits from vitamin D were dose-dependent,” said Kurt Lu, MD, senior author on the study and Assistant Professor of Dermatology at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center. “We hypothesize that vitamin D helps promote protective barriers in the skin by rapidly reducing inflammation. What we did not expect was that at a certain dose, vitamin D not only was capable of suppressing inflammation, it was also activating skin repair genes.”

The trial is the first to describe acute anti-inflammatory benefits from taking vitamin D. According to the authors, despite widespread attention given to vitamin D deficiency, “there is a lack of evidence demonstrating that intervention with vitamin D is capable of resolving acute inflammation.” By measuring gene activity in the biopsies, the researchers also uncovered a potential mechanism behind how vitamin D aids skin repair. The results suggest vitamin D increases skin levels of an anti-inflammatory enzyme, arginase-1. The enzyme enhances tissue repair after damage and helps activate other anti-inflammatory proteins.

The study may have people flocking to vitamin supplement aisles, but Lu stresses that the trial tested very high doses of vitamin D that far exceed daily allowances. The Food and Drug Administration’s recommended adult daily allowance for vitamin D is 400 IU. Said Lu, “I would not recommend at this moment that people start taking vitamin D after sunburn based on this study alone. But, the results are promising and worthy of further study.” Lu and colleagues are planning additional studies that could inform treatment plans for burn patients.

https://www.brightsurf.com/news/article/070617433327/vitamin-d-may-improve-sunburn-according-to-new-clinical-trial.html

New research shows that acne increases risk of depression by more than 60%

ndividuals with acne have a significantly increased risk for depression within the first 5 years after receiving an acne diagnosis, according to a recent study.

For their study, Dr Isabelle Vallerand, of the University of Calgary in Canada, and colleagues obtained and evaluated patient data from the 1986-2012 Health Improvement Network (THIN) in the United Kingdom.

Results of the analysis revealed that individuals with acne had a 63% higher risk for depression within 1 year after diagnosis compared with individuals without acne, thus indicating the importance of evaluating patients with acne for symptoms of depression.

“This study highlights an important link between skin disease and mental illness,” Dr Vallerand said in a press release.

“Given the risk of depression was highest in the period right after the first time a patient presented to a physician for acne concerns, it shows just how impactful our skin can be towards our overall mental health.”

—Christina Vogt

Reference:

Vallerand IA, Lewinson RT, Parsons LM, et al. Risk of depression among patients with acne in the U.K.: a population-based cohort study [published online February 7, 2018]. Brit J Dermatol. doi:10.1111/bjd.16099.

https://www.consultant360.com/exclusives/acne-inflates-depression-risk-63

New drug approved by U.S. FDA to dissolve chin fat without surgery

The Food and Drug Administration will now let you say bye-bye to nasty neck fat and hello to a jawline that doesn’t jiggle. The agency approved the first drug that can eliminate neck fat in most people without surgery.

The drug, known by its commercial name of Kybella, is a deoxycholic acid made by Californa’s Kythera Biopharmaceuticals. This is the same acid your body produces to help it absorb fat. It takes only a few minutes for a licensed dermatologist to inject it under the jawline right into your fat tissue.

The drug immediately goes to work on your wattle, destroying the cell membrane of what doctors call “submental fat,” causing it to burst and go away permanently. That’s great news for patients seeking improvement in an area many people consider a real problem. About 68% of people surveyed by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery in 2014 named excess fat under the chin and neck one of their top concerns. Many people say they think a double chin makes them look older than they actually are.

Maybe that will make the pain of getting up to 50 injections in a single treatment go down a little bit easier. The good news is it takes only a few days to heal, and there are no bandages necessary to make you look like a Dickensian Jacob Marley’s ghost. But it may take several sessions to eliminate all your problem areas.

The FDA approved the drug after the manufacturer submitted 19 clinical studies involving nearly 2,600 patients. The tests showed the drug worked to eliminate moderate to severe chin fat. Currently, the only other way to delete your double chin is to have surgery, having the fat removed with traditional liposuction. In the past, a drug called Lipodissolve, also known on the streets of Beverly Hills as “lunchtime lipo,” prompted an FDA warning letter in 2010 that suggested that treatment could cause permanent scarring and skin deformities.

Side effects for a small number of patients in the Kybella drug trials included nerve injury in the jaw that lead to a lopsided smile or facial weakness. It also may cause bruising, swelling, redness and some pain in some patients. Insurance does not cover this treatment.

While this drug may be a success for your neck, don’t expect to see it dissolving fat in other problem places, the FDA warns.

“It is important to remember that Kybella is only approved for the treatment of fat occurring below the chin, and it is not known if Kybella is safe or effective for treatment outside of this area,” Dr. Amy G. Egan, deputy director of the Office of Drug Evaluation III in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in a news release.

The drug should be commercially available in June, the company said.

http://edition.cnn.com/2015/04/30/health/chin-fat-drug-fda-approval/index.html