How we think as children may be linked to our cognitive performance at age 70

Our thinking skills in childhood could offer a glimpse into how our minds might work at the age of 70, according to a study spanning decades. The research started in 1946, when 502 8-year-olds, who were born in the U.K. in the same week, took tests to measure their thinking and memory skills. The participantsContinue reading “How we think as children may be linked to our cognitive performance at age 70”

Trans Fats, Bad for the Heart, May Be Bad for the Brain as Well

By Nicholas Bakalar Trans fatty acids, known to increase the risk for heart disease, stroke and diabetes, have now been linked to an increased risk for dementia. Researchers measured blood levels of elaidic acid, the most common trans fats, in 1,628 men and women 60 and older and free of dementia. Over the following 10Continue reading “Trans Fats, Bad for the Heart, May Be Bad for the Brain as Well”

A newly identified type of dementia that is sometimes mistaken for Alzheimer’s disease

Doctors have newly outlined a type of dementia that could be more common than Alzheimer’s among the oldest adults, according to a report published Tuesday in the journal Brain. The disease, called LATE, may often mirror the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease, though it affects the brain differently and develops more slowly than Alzheimer’s. Doctors sayContinue reading “A newly identified type of dementia that is sometimes mistaken for Alzheimer’s disease”

Your Blood Type May Help Protect You From Cognitive Decline

Findings indicate that smaller volumes of grey matter are associated with non-‘O’ blood types. Image credit: The researchers. A pioneering study conducted by leading researchers at the University of Sheffield has revealed blood types play a role in the development of the nervous system and may cause a higher risk of developing cognitive decline. TheContinue reading “Your Blood Type May Help Protect You From Cognitive Decline”

New neurons for life? Old people can still make fresh brain cells, study finds

By Emily Underwood One of the thorniest debates in neuroscience is whether people can make new neurons after their brains stop developing in adolescence—a process known as neurogenesis. Now, a new study finds that even people long past middle age can make fresh brain cells, and that past studies that failed to spot these newcomersContinue reading “New neurons for life? Old people can still make fresh brain cells, study finds”

Having great-grandparents or cousins with Alzheimer’s disease substantially increases your risk of developing it also.

Having a parent with Alzheimer’s disease has been known to raise a person’s risk of developing the disease, but new research published in Neurology suggests that having second- and third-degree relatives who have had Alzheimer’s may also increase risk. “Family history is an important indicator of risk for Alzheimer’s disease, but most research focuses onContinue reading “Having great-grandparents or cousins with Alzheimer’s disease substantially increases your risk of developing it also.”

Scientists ‘Clear’ Alzheimer’s Plaque From Mice Using Only Light And Sound

Clumps of harmful proteins that interfere with brain functions have been partially cleared in mice using nothing but light and sound. Research led by MIT has found strobe lights and a low pitched buzz can be used to recreate brain waves lost in the disease, which in turn remove plaque and improve cognitive function inContinue reading “Scientists ‘Clear’ Alzheimer’s Plaque From Mice Using Only Light And Sound”

Eating mushrooms may reduce the risk of cognitive decline

A team from the Department of Psychological Medicine and Department of Biochemistry at the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine at the National University of Singapore (NUS) has found that seniors who consume more than two standard portions of mushrooms weekly may have 50 per cent reduced odds of having mild cognitive impairment (MCI). AContinue reading “Eating mushrooms may reduce the risk of cognitive decline”

Germs in Your Gut Are Talking to Your Brain. Scientists Want to Know What They’re Saying.

By Carl Zimmer In 2014 John Cryan, a professor at University College Cork in Ireland, attended a meeting in California about Alzheimer’s disease. He wasn’t an expert on dementia. Instead, he studied the microbiome, the trillions of microbes inside the healthy human body. Dr. Cryan and other scientists were beginning to find hints that theseContinue reading “Germs in Your Gut Are Talking to Your Brain. Scientists Want to Know What They’re Saying.”

Study Offers Hint of Hope for Staving Off Dementia in Some People by Controlling Blood Pressure

Coloured positron emission tomography (PET, centre) and computed tomography (CT, left) scans of the brain of a 62-year-old woman with Alzheimer’s disease. By Pam Belluck In dementia research, so many paths have led nowhere that any glimmer of optimism is noteworthy. So some experts are heralding the results of a large new study, which foundContinue reading “Study Offers Hint of Hope for Staving Off Dementia in Some People by Controlling Blood Pressure”