Experimental Blood Test Could Flag Alzheimer’s

New studies show that elevated levels of a form of tau called p-tau217 can accurately distinguish Alzheimer’s disease from other forms of dementia, and perhaps even predict it. by Kerry Grens Three studies presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference this week describe the performance of blood tests used to diagnose, and even predict, Alzheimer’sContinue reading “Experimental Blood Test Could Flag Alzheimer’s”

Neupro may reduce cognitive dysfunction among patients with Alzheimer’s disease

The dopaminergic agonist Neupro appeared to improve frontal cognitive functions and activities of daily living among patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease, according to study results published in JAMA Network Open. “Some early attempts have been carried out using dopaminergic drugs, such as L-dopa or selegiline, in samples of patients with Alzheimer’s disease atContinue reading “Neupro may reduce cognitive dysfunction among patients with Alzheimer’s disease”

Higher BMI in early adulthood linked to increased dementia risk, new study suggests

Risk is 1.8 times higher for overweight women and 2.5 times higher for men by Ella Pickover People who are overweight in early adult life may be more prone to dementia in later life, a study suggests. Those aged 20 to 49 who have a high body mass index have a higher risk of dementiaContinue reading “Higher BMI in early adulthood linked to increased dementia risk, new study suggests”

Aerobic exercise limits risk of Alzheimer’s in vulnerable adults

A new study has found a new link between regular aerobic exercise and improved cognitive function in brain regions associated with Alzheimer’s disease. By Nick Lavars Previous research has shown us how regular exercise can be beneficial for cognitive function and help stave off the brain degeneration associated with dementia and Alzheimer’s, but scientists continueContinue reading “Aerobic exercise limits risk of Alzheimer’s in vulnerable adults”

Midlife Obesity in Women May Increase Risk for Dementia Later

In women, midlife obesity is associated with increased risk for dementia later in life, while no clear associations are apparent for low body mass index (BMI), low caloric intake, or inactivity at baseline, according to a study published online Dec. 18 in Neurology. Sarah Floud, Ph.D., from the University of Edinburgh in the United Kingdom,Continue reading “Midlife Obesity in Women May Increase Risk for Dementia Later”

Study shows extra virgin olive oil staves off multiple forms of dementia in mice

Boosting brain function is key to staving off the effects of aging. And if there was one thing every person should consider doing right now to keep their brain young, it is to add extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) to their diet, according to research by scientists at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine atContinue reading “Study shows extra virgin olive oil staves off multiple forms of dementia in mice”

Life-long strategies that may help decrease the risk of developing dementia

There are no instant, miracle cures. But recent studies suggest we have more control over our cognitive health than we might think. It just takes some effort. When it comes to battling dementia, the unfortunate news is this: Medications have proven ineffective at curing or stopping the disease and its most common form, Alzheimer’s disease.Continue reading “Life-long strategies that may help decrease the risk of developing dementia”

People who cannot read may be three times as likely to develop dementia

New research has found that people who are illiterate, meaning they never learned to read or write, may have nearly three times greater risk of developing dementia than people who can read and write. The study is published in the November 13, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy ofContinue reading “People who cannot read may be three times as likely to develop dementia”

Rare case offers clues to staving off Alzheimer’s

Francisco Lopera, a neurologist at the University of Antioquia in Medellin, Colombia, has been painstakingly collecting brains, birth and death records from one sprawling Colombian family to study Alzheimer’s.Credit…Federico Rios Escobar for The New York Times A woman with lots of beta-amyloid buildup (red) in her brain remained cognitively healthy for decades. by Kelly ServickContinue reading “Rare case offers clues to staving off Alzheimer’s”

China approves 1st new drug for Alzheimer’s disease in 17 years

By Julie Zaugg and Jared Peng Authorities in China have approved a drug for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, the first new medicine with the potential to treat the cognitive disorder in 17 years. The seaweed-based drug, called Oligomannate, can be used for the treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer’s, according to a statement fromContinue reading “China approves 1st new drug for Alzheimer’s disease in 17 years”