Stoned mom arrested after driving with 5 month old baby on roof

 

The following is a break down of some seriously bad parenting at the hands of 19-year-old teen mom Catalina Clouser from Phoenix, Arizona.

On Friday night Clouser and her boyfriend had been smoking a little weed at a public park. After this they decided to head to a store and buy some beer with Catalina’s baby in the car. Hey boyfriend was pulled over and popped for DUI. Being upset over that whole situation, Clouser decided to take herself and her child to a friend’s house where she, “admittedly smoked one or two additional bowls of marijuana.”

After getting stoned Clouser thought it would be a good idea to head on home with her infant son asleep in the car seat. It wasn’t until she got home that she became aware that her son was missing. According to Phoenix Police officer James Holmes:

“It appears the suspect put the baby on the roof of the car and drove off, forgetting he was still on the roof.”

Freaked out, Clouser started dialing up friends frantically attempting to retrace her steps trying to figure out the location of her son. Once she pieced together what had happened officers were already on the scene. Holmes added:

“The officers did find that the car seat was damaged. There were scrapes on the car seat, obviously from a fall. We’re thinking that based on her possible impairment, she just didn’t realize that she had placed that baby at one o’clock in the morning on top of the car when she took off.”

Both Holmes and local station KTVK have reported that the 5-week-old infant is, “perfectly OK,” and that he has been placed in the care of Arizona Child Protective Services.

Catalina Clouser was arrested and has been charged with aggravated DUI and child abuse.

http://starcasm.net/archives/158865

Economists determine that US would save billions of dollars by legalizing marijuana

 

 

Where there’s pot, there’s gold. So conclude more than 300 economists who say that the government — if it got out of the business of enforcing marijuana laws — could save a whopping $7.7 billion annually. Harvard economist Jeffrey Miron also figures there’s another $6 billion to be mined each year by taxing the drug at rates similar to booze and tobacco. The economists, who have signed a petition, don’t exactly go as far as Miron in suggesting pot be legalized but maintain that it’s high time, so to speak, for an “open and honest debate.”

http://now.msn.com/money/0417-billions-saved-by-legalizing-weed.aspx

 

Marcia Usher: Drunk Florida Woman Facing Multiple Charges After She Called 911 for Help Finding a Place to Urinate

A woman needing help finding the bathroom is now facing numerous charges.

Her first mistake: calling 911 for her restroom emergency.

The Pasco Sheriff’s Office says 32-year-old Marcia Usher placed the 911 call Wednesday night, saying she was lost in the woods and didn’t know where she should urinate.

Responding deputies found Usher not in the woods, but instead in front of her home, reportedly intoxicated and drinking a beer.

A deputy noticed a nearby open beer cooler and asked Usher if he could check inside for any weapons or drugs. According to the arrest report, Usher complied and told the deputy there was beer and a knife inside.

Instead of a knife, the deputy immediately saw a loaded handgun on top of the beer.

The deputy tried putting Usher in handcuffs, and a brief struggle ensued.  She was reportedly tackled to the ground and taken into custody without further incident.

At the jail, a vial of meth residue was allegedly discovered on Usher during a strip search.

She now faces charges of carrying a concealed weapon without a permit, possession of methamphetamine, introduction/possession of contraband in a detention facility, and resisting arrest without violence.

http://www.wtsp.com/news/article/243316/8/Deputies-Drunk-woman-calls-911-to-say-she-was-lost-in-woods-did-not-know-where-to-urinate

 

Nomophobia

 

According to recent research sponsored by SecurEnvoy, an internet security firm, more people feel anxious and tense when they are out of reach of their phone — and the younger they are, the more likely the stress.

Known as “nomophobia,” or “no mobile-phone phobia,” a recent online survey of 1,000 people in the UK found that almost two thirds (66%) of respondents were afflicted, a rise of 11% when compared to a similar study four years ago.

“Some people get panic attacks when they are not with their phones,” said Michael Carr-Gregg, an adolescent psychologist working in Melbourne.

“Others become very anxious and make all endeavors to locate the mobile phone. I have clients who abstain from school or their part-time jobs to look for their phones when they cannot find them in the morning.”

CNN Photos: De-Vice: Our mobile addiction

According to the survey, the younger you are, the more prone you are to nomophobia. The youngest age group (18 -24) tops the nomophobic list at 77%, which is 11% more than that of the next group — those aged 25-34.

“This is the most tribal generation of young people,” said Carr-Gregg. “Adolescents want to be with their friends on a 24-hour basis.”

Women are also more likely to be unnerved by cell phone separation, with 70% of respondents reporting the malady compared to 61% of men. Andy Kemshall, the CTO and co founder of secure Envoy, believes that may be because men are more likely to have two phones and are less likely to misplace both — 47% of men carry two phones, compared to only 33% of women.

Major drivers of nomophobia include boredom, loneliness, and insecurity, said Carr-Gregg, while some young nomophobes cannot bear solitude. “Many of my clients go to bed with their mobile phones while sleeping just like how one will have the teddy bear in the old days,” he said.

“While teddy doesn’t communicate, the phone does,” said Carr-Gregg, adding insomnia to the list of potential problems.

“This reduced the amount of time to reflect,” he said. “Some kids cannot entertain themselves. The phone has become our digital security blanket.”

As smartphone penetration spreads across the globe, so does nomophobia. On a visit to Singapore in February this year, Carr-Gregg spoke to students from a peer support group at the United World College and identified similar problems.

“There is no doubt that nomophobia is international,” he said. “[But] without phones, there will not be nomophobia.”

Meanwhile, Indian researchers have also evaluated mobile phone dependence among students at M.G.M. Medical College and the associated hospital of central India. India, after China, is the second largest mobile phone market in the world. The Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) reported that there were 884.37 million mobile connections in India as of November, while China had 963.68 million.

The cross-sectional study, published by the Indian Journal of Community Medicine three years ago, recruited 200 medical students and scholars. About one in five students were nomophobic, results showed. The study claimed that the mobile phone has become “a necessity because of the countless perks that a mobile phone provides like personal diary, email dispatcher, calculator, video game player, camera and music player.”

“There is an increase in the nomophobic population in India because the number of mobile phone users has increased,” said Dr. Sanjay Dixit, one the researchers and the head of the Indian Journal of Community Medicine. “We are currently doing another research on mobile phone dependency, it’s not published yet, but analysis shows that about 45% of the Indian population, not just medical students, is nomophobic.”

With the augmented ownership and usage of smartphones among adolescents, Dixit says the young population is more at risk, partly because they can access the Internet through phones more easily, increasing the time spent on phones.

“We found out that people who use mobile phones for more than three hours a day have a higher chance of getting nomophobia,” he said, warning this can pose potential dangers.

Accidents lurk while nomophobes fix their attention on phones. According to Dixit, up to 25% nomophobes reported accidents while messaging or talking on the phone, which includes minor road accidents, falling while going upstairs or downstairs and stumbling while walking. More than 20% also reported pain in the thumbs due to excessive texting.

“One could look at this as a form of addiction to the phone,” said Eric Yu Hai Chen, a psychiatrist and professor at The University of Hong Kong. “The fear is part of the addiction. The use of hand phone has some features that predispose this activity to addiction, similar to video games, naming, easy access.”

To tackle anxiety and accidents induced by phones, Dixit suggests switching off the phone, especially while driving. “People can also carry a charger all the time,” he said. “Our study shows that the no-battery-situation upsets nomophobes the most.

“People can also prepay phone cards for emergency calls and credit balance in phones to ensure a constant and functioning network,” he said. Other solutions include supplying friends with an alternate contact number and storing important phone numbers somewhere else as backups.

“Enforcing a period when handset is turned off can help loosen its hold over everyday life,” said Dixit. Sometimes, the problem can even be the cure.

“One of my clients actually makes use mobile phone apps to deal with anxiety,” said Carr-Gregg. “It’s called iCounselor Anxiety.”

The launch of the app presents users with a scale to rate their anxiety levels from 1 to 10, where 10 is “panicked.” After choosing the level, ten recommendations of calming activities will be suggested, followed by instructions to change the user’s thoughts, so to change subsequent feelings.

“It is almost like having a psychologist in your phone,” said Carr-Gregg.

Prevalent it may be, nomophobia, however, is not yet a qualified phobia.

“Nomophobia is not included in the DSM [Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders] yet,” said Dixit. “But it is an up coming problem. For the first time on this continent [India], we are trying to make it more scientific,” he added, referring to his undergoing research on nomophobic India.

http://www.cnn.com/2012/03/06/tech/mobile/nomophobia-mobile-addiction/index.html?hpt=hp_c4

Bridge in India May Collapse Due to Human Spit

 

In the Indian city of Kolkata lies a bridge that is in danger, although not from vandals, weather or natural erosion, or even age.

No, the culprit is spit.

The Howrah Bridge is a cantilever suspension bridge that crosses the Hooghly River. Over the years, residents have been purchasing and chewing a mix of betel leaf, areca nut, and slaked lime, then spitting the mixture at the base of the bridge.

The mixture, known as paan, is a mild stimulant and, if you take a look at the weakened steel hangars of the bridge, also quite corrosive.

The hangars, which were once 6 millimeters thick, are now a mere 3 mm, prompting authorities to come up with news ways to prevent any future damage.

One such way is to cover the bridge’s steel with a fiberglass casing.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2011-11-24/human-spit-build-up-could-cause-bridge-collapse/3691468

Adddicted To Tanning

 Tanning beds might be just as addictive to certain people as drugs and alcohol.

A new study, conducted by University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center researcher Bryon Adinoff, showed that an addictive “reward-and-reinforcement” reaction is stimulated in the brains of people who consider themselves frequent tanners.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/08/11/tanning-beds-addictive-drugs-booze-alcohol_n_924481.html

Thanks to Mrs. L for bringing this to the attention of the It’s Interesting community.