Posts Tagged ‘Viking’


The remains of a Viking ship that was 52 to 56 feet (16 to 17 meters) long were found near a medieval church at Edøy, on the island of Smøla in Norway.

by Owen Jarus

The remains of a Viking ship have been discovered on a farm near a medieval church at Edøy, on the island of Smøla, in Norway.

The ship, which is 52 to 56 feet (16 to 17 meters) long, appears to be part of a burial mound, suggesting that it was used to bury someone important, said its discoverers, archaeologists Manuel Gabler and Dag-Øyvind Engtrø Solem, both with the Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage Research (NIKU).

They don’t know if there is a skeleton or multiple skeletons inside the boat.

The archaeologists used high-resolution georadar mounted on a cart to make the discovery. In fact, it was almost by chance they spotted the ship’s outline.

“We had actually finished the agreed-upon area, but we had time to spare and decided to do a quick survey over another field. It turned out to be a good decision,” Manuel Gabler, an archaeologist with NIKU, said in a statement.


The ship was found near this medieval church by archaeologists using georadar mounted on a cart. (Image credit: NIKU)

The ship dates back more than 1,000 years to the time of the Vikings or even a bit earlier, Knut Paasche, head of the Department of Digital Archaeology at NIKU and an expert on Viking ships, said in a statement.

Radar images had enough resolution to make out what was left of the fore and aft, which had been nearly destroyed in the past by farming plows. The hull seems to be in good shape, according to a news report by Ars Technica. The radar also revealed the remains of two houses, likely part of a Viking settlement, but the archaeologists aren’t sure of the structures’ age. Archaeologists and local authorities hope to do a larger survey of the area around the ship burial. It’s not certain when the ship itself will be excavated, although it won’t be done in the near future, said a spokesperson for NIKU.

The survey at Edøy was done as a collaboration between Møre and Romsdal County, Smøla municipality and NIKU. The Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology helped develop the georadar technology used in the survey.

https://www.livescience.com/viking-ship-georadar-norway.html?utm_source=notification

A lost Viking army which was a “key part” of the creation of England may have been identified by archaeologists.

More than 250 skeletons found at St Wystan’s church, Repton, Derbyshire, have been dated to the 9th Century.

Chronicles state a “large heathen army” began to hack its way across England in AD866, toppling Anglo-Saxon kings until being halted by Alfred the Great.

Cat Jarman from the University of Bristol said: “This army had left almost no trace, but maybe here it is.”

In AD866 the Vikings went from ferocious raiders to an invading force – the Viking Great Army had arrived.

Ms Jarman, from the department of Anthropology and Archaeology, said: “This was a key part in the story of how England was made.

“The defeat of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms, the creation of a Viking state and Alfred’s reaction to it were all major parts of this. Its echoes are still felt today.

“But because of the lack of physical evidence it has not been given the attention it deserves.”

The Viking army was believed to have wintered at Repton in AD873 but the evidence did not add up.

A mysterious mound in St Wystan’s church yard excavated in the 1970s and 80s contained the remains of at least 264 people.

But nearly 20% were women and there were few signs of battle injuries.

Carbon dating showed bones dating from the 200 years previous to the Viking invasion.

Ms Jarman said: “We found the carbon dating had been thrown out by those individuals having a diet high in seafood.

“Once adjusted, the dates matched the records.

“And a new analysis of the bones… showed traumatic injury, while the role of women in Viking armies is better understood.”

Other graves with probable Viking links were investigated, and one may contain sacrificial victims.

Four children, aged eight to 18, were buried near the mass grave and at least two have signs of traumatic injury.

Ms Jarman said it “parallels accounts of sacrificial killings to accompany Viking dead”.

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-42918121