Posts Tagged ‘running’

Every hour you run extends your life span by seven hours, a new study has revealed.

Scientists say that running just one hour a week is the most effective exercise to increase life expectancy.

This holds true no matter how many miles or how fast you run, the researchers claim.
For those that take this advice to heart and run regularly, they say you can extend your life span by up to three years.

The study, conducted at Iowa State University, reanalyzed data from The Cooper Institute, in Texas, and also examined results from a number of other recent studies that looked at the link between exercise and mortality.

Scientists found that the new review reinforced the findings of earlier research.
At whatever pace or mileage, a person’s risk of premature death dropped by 40 percent when he or she took up running.

This applied even when researchers controlled for smoking, drinking or a history of health problems such as obesity.

Three years ago, the same team conducted a study that analyzed more than 55,000 adults, and determined that running for just seven minutes a day could help slash the risk of dying from heart disease.

They followed participants over a period of 15 years, and found that of the more than 3,000 who died, only one-third of deaths were from heart disease.

Co-author Dr Duck-chul High-mileage runners also questioned if they were overperforming and if, at some point, running would actually contribute to premature mortality.
After analyzing the data in the new study, scientists determined that hour for hour, running statistically returns more time to people’s lives than it consumes.
In The Cooper Institute study, participants reported an average of two hours running per week.
The amount ran over the course of 40 years would add up to fewer than six months, but it could increase life expectancy by more than three years.

The researchers also determined that if every non-runner who had been part of the reviewed studies took up the sport, there would have been 16 percent fewer deaths over all, and 25 percent fewer fatal heart attacks.

Other types of exercise were also found to be beneficial. Walking and cycling dropped the risk of premature death by about 12 percent.

Dr Lee says scientists remain uncertain as to why running helps with longevity.

But he says it’s likely because the sport combats many common risk factors for early death, including high blood pressure and extra body fat, especially around the middle.

It also raises aerobic fitness, one of the best-known indicators for long-term health.
Running, however, does not make you immortal and the life expectancy rates don’t increase beyond three years.

Improvements in life expectancy generally plateaued at about four hours of running per week, Dr Lee said. But they did not decline.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4405252/Every-hour-run-adds-7-hours-lifespan.html#ixzz4e5eSXAzj

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by JENN SAVEDGE

A new study has found that slower runners live longer than those who push the pace

For the study, which was published recently in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, researchers surveyed about 5,000 people, including 1,100 runners and 4,000 people who identified themselves as “non-runners.” Participants in the non-running group did not engage in any type of regular exercise or strenuous activity.

Those in the “running” group were split into three groups depending upon how far, how fast and how often they ran. The study participants were men and women of various ages who were considered relatively healthy.

Researchers checked back with the group after 10 years and found (not surprisingly) that the runners had longer lifespans than their sedentary peers. But what was surprising was the longevity difference among the runners. Those with the lowest rate of death were the light joggers, folks who ran roughly two to three times per week for about 1 to 2.4 miles per session at a speed self-described as “slow.”

Next in line in terms of lifespan were the moderate runners, followed by the speedsters, who tied with the non-runners for highest mortality rate. That’s right, those who ran hard and fast had the same lifespan as those who never left the couch.

http://www.mnn.com/health/fitness-well-being/blogs/slow-running-better-for-your-health

A Royal Marine who had his leg blown off, leaving his Liverpool FC tattoo missing a word and reading You’ll Never Walk, has defied the odds to become a runner and climber.

Andy Grant, 26, had his limb amputated after he stood on an improvised explosive device (IED) while on routine foot patrol in Afghanistan.

He had an operation to remove the leg below the knee and woke up to find the word Alone missing from his You’ll Never Walk Alone tattoo.

However, the father of three used the ironic inking as inspiration and went through vigorous rehabilitation sessions for 18 months.

He has not only learnt to walk, but is now closing in on a running world record.

Mr Grant, who lives in Liverpool and was serving with 45 Commando at the time of the blast, said he has always seen the funny side.

He said: “I am a huge Liverpool fan so had the Liver bird and the words to the song You’ll Never Walk Alone on my leg.

“The tattoo that I have been left with has always been a bit of a joke. I use it in my motivational speeches.

“It is ironic that it says I will never walk as I have gone on to run 10k in 40 mins. At the moment I am just two minutes off a record record for the 10k for a single leg amputee and I have that in my sights.

“It is bizarre and I just laugh about it. But it adds to my story I guess. The fact is that regardless of what the words says, the operation allowed me to walk and run and do so much else. You have got to see the funny side of it.

“I also won a couple of gold medals at the Invictus Games and got to abseil the shard so I don’t think I have done too badly.

“I guess I did use the tattoo I was left with as an extra inspiration. But I was always going to prove it wrong.”

The impact of the IED blast in Sangin six years ago severed Mr Grant’s femoral artery and took out a “big chunk” of his thigh. He broke both the fibula and tibia in his right leg and lost 6cm of bone.

But two years after the blast, the 26-year-old decided to have his right leg amputated after watching comrades with similar injuries enjoying activities with their prosthetic legs.

He can still recall the conversation he had with surgeon Anthony Lambert when he woke up.

Mr Lambert told him: “Well, we had to raise a flap of skin on your leg to cover the bone ends… and it’s meant that your Liverpool Football Club tattoos are a bit messed up. The Liver bird is a bit all over the place, and your tattoo now says ‘you’ll never walk’.”

The date of his blast, February 3, and the date of his amputation, November 25, are both anniversaries that Andy marks.

He said: “The anniversary of the blast is a bitter sweet day, but one that I like to get together with friends and family.

“I am very proud of my achievements and like to turn my story around to try and inspire other people about what they can achieve in the face of adversity.

“I am all about looking forward. I can not undo what happened and I have no regrets. I am all about making the best of a bad situation.”

Such is his positive outlook on life now, he says he feels like the bomb blast was “worthwhile”.

He said: “It’s been a rollercoaster ride of emotions, and it’s been bittersweet for me. On that day in 2009 I basically ended my career in the corps. I lost a bit of myself on that day and, as a 20-year-old I changed.

“It’s been hard when you look at it like that, but on the flip side I’ve had some amazing experiences that almost make it seem like it was worthwhile.

“It is weird to hear myself say that, but it just shows the level of recovery. It’s opened so many doors.

“My job as an inspirational speaker takes me around the world; I’ve started amazing relationships with people; I have three children and an amazing family; I’m looking to row across the Atlantic; and I’m hoping to be picked for the Paralympics next year.

“My life has moved on in an amazing way and it’s all down to what happened. It’s given me more of a life than I probably would have had.”

The Liverpool Football Club fan left the Royal Marines in May, 2012 and now works as a motivational speaker.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/defence/11394618/Royal-Marines-Liverpool-FC-tattoo-reads-Youll-Never-Walk-after-amputation.html