Posts Tagged ‘Ohio’


Second Breath will help save lives during coronavirus pandemic

It’s called “Second Breath,” and this piece of equipment will save lives.

“Without this ventilator there are a lot of folks who might not have a chance at a breath,” said Dr. Mada Helou, from University Hospitals.

Three Cleveland organizations put their innovative skills, knowledge and can-do attitude together to create and manufacturer a breathing pump that will alleviate some of the demand for ventilators, all across the country.

“We like to respond to things, and more importantly the team likes to respond. There were eight engineers that developed this and these guys wanted to do something and they came to me,” said Dan T. Moore, president and CEO, Dan T. Moore Co.

It collaborated with several other organizations and in three weeks, designed “Second Breath.”

“Coronavirus’ main target is the lungs. It effects many organs, but it has a profound effect on our ability to hold oxygen within our blood,” said Dr. Helou.

Experts said an average ventilator costs anywhere from $20,000 and up to $100,000. Second Breath costs about $6,000.

Dan T. Moore Co. has made about 36 ventilators and they’re ready to ship out around the world. Engineers told 19 News they can design about a hundred ventilators a day.

The team tells 19 News they are proud.

“I think great innovation comes under pressure and when the COVID-19 surge showed up folks thought you know what, we need to respond to this quickly,” said Dr. Helou. “Everything about this says Cleveland. It speaks helping people and it speaks collaboration,” she said. “Cleveland, you’ve done this!”

https://www.fox19.com/2020/04/16/ohio-company-invents-second-breath-ventilator-that-will-save-lives-during-coronavirus-pandemic/

A man from Twinsburg, Ohio, was expecting to receive a letter in the mail.

Instead, when Dan Cain went to the Twinsburg Post Office to find 79 bins of mail, each containing roughly 700 copies of the same letter addressed to him, he knew something was very wrong.
“I was shocked. Are you kidding me? Who makes that kind of mistake?” Cain told CNN affiliate WOIO.

The letters were from the College Avenue Student Loan Company. The company had intended to send Cain and his wife a statement for a student loan they took out for their daughter’s tuition.

Cain said the company apologized and told him there had been a glitch in the outgoing mail system, WOIO reported. CNN has reached out to the College Avenue Student Loan Company for comment.
A US Postal Service spokeswoman said the delivery of 55,000 letters was uncommon.

“The 55,000 letters that were delivered to the customer in Twinsburg, Ohio, is not something we see often, said spokeswoman Naddia Dhalai. “However, the Postal Service is committed to providing the best customer service so every piece of mail we receive will be delivered to our customers.”

Compounding the mistake, the 55,000 letters had an incorrect payment amount, according to Cain. The company used the wrong interest rate to calculate the payment, he said.

The company apologized for that mistake as well and said Cain would receive a new, corrected statement, Cain said. This time, Cain hopes it will be a single letter.

“I just hope it doesn’t happen again,” he said. “I might have to return to sender.”

Cain had to pick up the bins up from the back doors of the post office. It took him two trips to bring home the useless pile of letters, which he believes cost the company thousands of dollars to send, he said. If the company used a bulk rate discount of between 18 and 20 cents a letter, it would have cost up to $11,000 to mail the 55,000 statements.

And now, he’s not entirely sure what to do with the letters, which are stacked in his garage.

“I just may start a fire, a bonfire, and burn it all,” Cain said, laughing.

https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/04/us/twinsburg-55000-mail-post-office-trnd/index.html

As he accepted the coveted Heisman trophy, LSU quarterback Joe Burrow addressed the children in his hometown of Athens, Ohio, where thousands of residents live in poverty.

Burrow struggled to speak, holding back tears as he spoke about the children in his community who go hungry.

“Coming from southeast Ohio, it’s a very impoverished area and the poverty rate is almost two times the national average,” he said in his acceptance speech Saturday. “There’s so many people there that don’t have a lot. And I’m up here for all those kids in Athens and Athens County that go home to not a lot of food on the table, hungry after school. You guys can be up here, too.”

In a matter of hours, the unassuming Appalachian town — home to Ohio University — was launched to national attention, inspiring Athens resident Will Drabold to create a fundraiser for the thousands of residents living under the poverty line.

In just a day, the fundraiser was inundated with donations and quickly shot past its original $50,000 goal. The organizer later updated the goal to $100,000, which was met within hours. The goal had reached $400,000 by Tuesday afternoon.

As of 2 p.m. ET on Tuesday, more than $370,000 had been raised.

“Let’s answer Joey’s call to action by supporting a local nonprofit that serves food to more than 5,000 households in Athens County each year,” the fundraiser page says.

The nonprofit that puts food on Athens County tables

The donations will go to the Athens County Food Pantry, which says it serves over 3,400 meals a week to residents in need.

The pantry also gives bags and boxes of food to Athens families, including non-perishables such as pasta, beans, and canned vegetables, and it hands out fresh produce when it can.

About 30% of the county’s population lives below the poverty line, according to an Ohio poverty report released in February. It is among the poorest counties in the state, all of which are in the Appalachian region.

The nonprofit has identified a number of factors leading to such a high poverty rate, including unemployment and underemployment, lack of reliable transportation and high housing and utility costs.

The pantry said it was overwhelmed by the outpouring of support following Burrow’s speech.

“Many, many thanks to Joe Burrow for shining a light on food insecurity in our area and a very heartfelt thank you to everyone that has donated,” it said in a Facebook post.
Later in the day, Drabold wrote the athlete inspired children in the region.

“Some of these kids don’t get toys for Christmas. Some get their food from the food pantry. You cannot beat the power of role models and inspiration in their lives. None of these kids, who are in the same classrooms Joey was, will ever forget this.”

https://www.cnn.com/2019/12/16/us/joe-burrow-heisman-speech-athens-county-fundraiser-trnd/index.html

By Chris Mosby

When a devastating storm tore through the east side on Friday night, it felled a tree that predated Ohio (as a state) and Cleveland (as a city). The White Oak had lived through droughts, blizzards, presidents, wars and the founding of the nation. It could not, however, outlive a microburst with 100 mph winds.

Friday’s microburst, an intense downdraft during a thunderstorm, tore branches from trees, downed power lines and left thousands of people without power. Streets flooded, intersections closed and police did their best to manage traffic in the dark.

A tree fell at the Nature Center at Shaker Lakes and landed on power lines, leaning against the transformer. Trails were blocked, the wild flower garden was smashed by fallen limbs, and one of the biggest and oldest trees in the region was snapped at its base.

History Counted In Rings

The White Oak was a point of fascination for the Doan Brook Watershed Partnership, which had done research on the age of the tree, going so far as to conduct a coring, Nick Mikash, a natural resources specialist at the Nature Center, said. A coring removes a sliver of a tree to determine its age and history.

The group discovered the White Oak was more than 300 years old. It predated the founding of America in 1776 and the statehood of Ohio, granted in 1803. The tree was in Shaker Heights before it was known as Shaker Heights.

The North Union Shakers, a religious sect, settled the area now know as Shaker Heights in 1802, a year before Ohio joined the U.S. The planned pastoral utopia failed when Cleveland became an industrial center and two brothers began buying up land from the North Union Shakers.

The brothers — Oris Paxton and Mantis James Van Sweringen — named their new land Shaker Village. It was incorporated in 1912. The village later became a city and was renamed Shaker Heights, the city said on its website.

The White Oak, which grew on the west side of the lower lake near North Park, witnessed the gradual urbanization of its surroundings. The tree witnessed a religious sect become a village and then a city with paved roads and electrical wires. It saw residents born in Shaker grow old in the city. It stood as those residents went to war, opened businesses, entered their golden years and died. It watched the children of those residents mature and move away.

The tree was not an isolated watcher of events, though. It was seen and beloved as well.

Ashley Hall, the marketing coordinator for the Nature Center at Shaker Lakes, said educational programs frequently occurred around the tree. One visitor told her a costumed man used to climb the tree and then scamper out to tell stories to kids.

“In 1983 Fernway Elementary used to take us on field trips to [the] tree,” a Facebook user named Oliver wrote on the Nature Center’s page. “We would sit around the tree in silence and wait until this old bearded man in overalls would come crawling out of a hole in the base of the trunk. He would then tell us stories. It may have been the head of the nature center in costume.”

Hall jokingly said she hoped he worked for the Nature Center.

Memories like those shared by Oliver poured forth when news of the tree’s fate was made public. When the tree came down, it left many feeling emptier, more melancholy.

“People really have connections to these pieces of nature,” Hall said.

The Demise of History

Lightning didn’t hasten the death of the White Oak. Nature merely took its natural course.

The tree played an important role in its ecosystem. It was home to 500 inspect species and provided nutrients for parasitic honey mushrooms. Those mushrooms gradually ate away at the tree’s roots.

Mikash said the mushrooms may have been chipping away at the White Oak for a century. When the microburst hit, bringing tornado-strength winds with it, the tree was bowled over.

“It was weakened by the fungus and … 100 mph winds are hard to stand up against,” Mikash noted.

After it was felled, the White Oak’s interior appeared nearly hollow. People could climb inside the tree and literally be inside history, Hall and Mikash said.

In the aftermath of the storm, volunteers surveyed the White Oak and the damage at the Nature Center. They picked through the debris and found three acorns from the tree, Mikash said.

Maybe they’ll grow a new White Oak, a new tree that can observe another three centuries of human history, and serve as our silent companion in the woods.

https://patch.com/ohio/shakerheights/300-year-old-tree-falls-shaker-heights


Police captured a pig after a man called 911 to report the animal following him. (North Ridgeville Police Department)

Police officers in Ohio were convinced a man who called 911 about a pig following him was drunk and hallucinating — but turns out the caller was telling the truth, and “very sober.”

North Ridgeville police officers received a call just before 5:30 a.m. Saturday from a man who said a pig was following him while he was walking home from the Amtrak train station in Elyria, located about 30 miles west of Cleveland. The caller added that he “didn’t know what to do,” the department wrote in a Facebook post.

Police officers were skeptical to believe the man and thought he was intoxicated and walking home from the bar.

“Night shift responded to the obviously drunk guy walking home from the bar at 5:26 in the morning. He was at least drunk enough to call the police on himself while hallucinating,” the police department said.

But the officers’ theory was actually wrong. Not only was the man very sober and walking home from the train station (like he said), a pig was actually following him.

“Yes, a pig,” the department added.

One of the officers managed to get the pig into the police cruiser and take him to the city’s dog kennel — that doubled as a pig pen for a few hours.

By 8:23 a.m. Saturday, the pig was returned to its owner, whose identity was not revealed, police said.

“You’d have thought we would have learned our lesson after the kangaroo incident,” the police department said, referencing to a 2015 incident when a “runaway kangaroo” was located in the town.

North Ridgeville officers corral kangaroo on Lorain Road early Friday morning

The police department posted a photo of the pig in the police cruiser on Facebook, which received more than 21,000 reactions, 11,500 shares and more than 2,000 comments as of Sunday morning.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2018/05/20/ohio-man-calls-police-to-report-hes-being-followed-by-pig.html

Thanks to Kebmodee for bringing this to the It’s Interesting community.

By MELISSA LOCKER

“Zombie-like” raccoons have taken over an Ohio town. This isn’t the inevitable re-boot of Night of the Living Dead, though, or another Walking Dead spin-off. Instead, it’s an eery invasion that has authorities looking for answers.

Police in Youngstown, Ohio, have responded to over a dozen calls from concerned humans who have spotted raccoons behaving very strangely, according to local news outlet WKBN. The raccoons were seen popping up onto their hind legs, baring their teeth, and then falling over in a comatose state. The animals weren’t easy to scare off, either, and seemed to have lost their natural fear of humans. If that wasn’t odd enough, the majority of the sightings and calls happened in the daytime even though raccoons are nocturnal.

Police received calls about 14 raccoons over the past three weeks, with some of the residents making the zombie comparison. The Ohio Department of Natural Resources said it doesn’t sound like rabies, but rather a disease called distemper. If this diagnosis is correct, distemper is not transmissible to humans, but can be spread to dogs who come in contact with zombie raccoons.

According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, distemper “attacks the respiratory, gastrointestinal and nervous systems” of infected animals and symptoms include, “head tilt, muscle twitches … seizures, and partial or complete paralysis.” Unfortunately, the affected raccoons have to be captured and put down to prevent the disease from spreading further.

http://time.com/5229420/zombie-raccoons-ohio-police-reports/


A one-time intravenous infusion of the high dose of gene therapy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Ohio extended the survival of patients with spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA1) in a Phase 1 clinical trial, according to a study.

A one-time intravenous infusion of the high dose of gene therapy extended the survival of patients with spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA1) in a Phase 1 clinical trial, according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The study was conducted by Researchers from Nationwide Children’s Hospital in collaboration with AveXis, Inc. and The Ohio State University College of Medicine.

“My team at Nationwide Children’s has worked with commitment and dedication to develop a therapy that may subsequently be shown through future clinical trials to potentially alter the course of this unforgiving condition and provide a therapeutic option for the families and infants with SMA1,” says Jerry Mendell, MD, principal investigator in the Center for Gene Therapy at Nationwide Children’s.

SMA1 is a progressive, childhood, neuromuscular disease caused by a mutation in a single gene. Children with SMA1 fail to meet motor milestones and typically die or require permanent mechanical ventilation by 2 years of age. The phase 1 clinical trial is the first to test the functional replacement of the mutated gene responsible for SMA1.

A one-time intravenous injection of modified adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) delivered the SMN gene to 15 patients. Three patients received a low dose, while 12 patients received a high dose. In the Phase 1 trial, patients in the high dose group demonstrated improvement in motor function and they had a decreased need for supportive care compared to the natural history of the disease.

Specifically, at the end of the study period, all 15 patients appeared to have a favorable safety profile and to be generally well tolerated. Of the 12 patients treated with the high dose, 92 percent of patients have achieved head control, 75 percent of patients can roll over and 92 percent of patients can sit with assistance. Seventy-five percent of these patients are now sitting for 30 seconds or longer. Two patients can crawl, pull to stand and stand and walk independently.

According to natural history of the disease, patients require nutritional and respiratory support by 12 months of age, and are not able to swallow or speak effectively. Of the patients who received the high dose in study, 11 patients are able to speak, 11 patients are fed orally and seven do not require bi-level positive airway pressure as of the data cut-off (August 7, 2017).

“In this first phase of clinical trials, we have observed preliminary results that appear to be promising compared to the natural history of SMA Type 1,” says Dr. Mendell, also a faculty member at The Ohio State University College of Medicine.

This study builds on nearly three decades of foundational research led by teams at Nationwide Children’s and Ohio State’s Wexner Medical Center and exemplifies the strong basic science and clinical bonds between the two institutions. Arthur Burghes, PhD, of Ohio State created a ground-breaking SMA mouse model that remains the standard by which all therapies, including AVXS-101, are initially tested. Senior author of the study, Brian Kaspar, PhD, during his appointment at Nationwide Children’s discovered that the AAV9 vector was capable of crossing the blood brain barrier when injected into the vascular system to deliver genes directly to motor neurons. The two laboratories then collaborated to show that scAAV9-SMN, when delivered to SMA mice shortly after birth, completely prevented their neuromuscular disorder. The laboratories also collaborated to successfully prove that reversing a protein deficiency through gene therapy is effective in improving and stabilizing SMA in a large animal model. “In neurological disease, it is rare to go from gene defect to therapy so directly, and the fact that this has happened here in one place is perhaps even rarer,” said John Kissel, MD, chair of Neurology at Ohio State and director of the SMA Clinic at Nationwide Children’s.

AveXis, Inc., a clinical-stage gene therapy company developing treatments for patients suffering from rare and life-threatening neurological genetic diseases, announced in July 2016 that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted Breakthrough Therapy Designation for the treatment based on preliminary clinical results from the trial of AVXS-101.

“At AveXis, we are enormously pleased to see that all children who received AVXS-101 are alive and free of permanent ventilatory support at 20 months of age and older — an age where, sadly, only eight percent of untreated children with SMA Type 1 are expected to survive without permanent breathing support,” said Dr. Kaspar, now serving as Chief Scientific Officer at AveXis. “The New England Journal of Medicine publication marks an exciting milestone in the development of AVXS-101.”

Journal Reference:

Jerry R. Mendell, Samiah Al-Zaidy, Richard Shell, W. Dave Arnold, Louise R. Rodino-Klapac, Thomas W. Prior, Linda Lowes, Lindsay Alfano, Katherine Berry, Kathleen Church, John T. Kissel, Sukumar Nagendran, James L’Italien, Douglas M. Sproule, Courtney Wells, Jessica A. Cardenas, Marjet D. Heitzer, Allan Kaspar, Sarah Corcoran, Lyndsey Braun, Shibi Likhite, Carlos Miranda, Kathrin Meyer, K.D. Foust, Arthur H.M. Burghes, Brian K. Kaspar. Single-Dose Gene-Replacement Therapy for Spinal Muscular Atrophy. New England Journal of Medicine, 2017; 377 (18): 1713 DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1706198