Boosting a liver protein may mimic the brain benefits of exercise

By Laura Sanders Exercise’s power to boost the brain might require a little help from the liver. A chemical signal from the liver, triggered by exercise, helps elderly mice keep their brains sharp, suggests a study published in the July 10 Science. Understanding this liver-to-brain signal may help scientists develop a drug that benefits theContinue reading “Boosting a liver protein may mimic the brain benefits of exercise”

Light Enables Long-Term Memory Maintenance in Fruit Flies

S. Inami et al., “Environmental light is required for maintenance of long-term memory in Drosophila,” J Neurosci, 40:1427–39, 2020. by Diana Kwon As Earth rotates around its axis, the organisms that inhabit its surface are exposed to daily cycles of darkness and light. In animals, light has a powerful influence on sleep, hormone release, andContinue reading “Light Enables Long-Term Memory Maintenance in Fruit Flies”

Virtual reality experiments show that cannabis increases propensity for false memories

by Amy Schleunes When Lilian Kloft stumbled across a 2015 study showing a connection between cannabis use and susceptibility to false memories, she found herself wondering about the legal implications of the results. The study had discovered that heavy users of cannabis were more likely than controls to form false memories—recollections of events that neverContinue reading “Virtual reality experiments show that cannabis increases propensity for false memories”

If you could erase the worst memory of your life, would you? Scientists are working on a pill for that.

The 60 souls that signed on for Dr. Alain Brunet’s memory manipulation study were united by something they would rather not remember. The trauma of betrayal. For some, it was infidelity and for others, a brutal, unanticipated abandonment. “It was like, ‘I’m leaving you. Goodbye,” the McGill University associate professor of psychiatry says. In cold,Continue reading “If you could erase the worst memory of your life, would you? Scientists are working on a pill for that.”

Researchers implant a memory into a bird’s brain

by ABBY OLENA Animals learn by imitating behaviors, such as when a baby mimics her mother’s speaking voice or a young male zebra finch copies the mating song of an older male tutor, often his father. In a study published today in Science, researchers identified the neural circuit that a finch uses to learn theContinue reading “Researchers implant a memory into a bird’s brain”

Low-carb ‘keto’ diet (‘Atkins-style’) may modestly improve cognition in older adults

In a pilot study of 14 older adults with mild cognitive problems suggestive of early Alzheimer’s disease, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet may improve brain function and memory. Although the researchers say that finding participants willing to undertake restrictive diets for the three-month study—or partners willing to help them stickContinue reading “Low-carb ‘keto’ diet (‘Atkins-style’) may modestly improve cognition in older adults”

Neuroscientists Have Revealed What Your Brain Needs to Really Erase a Memory

by PETER DOCKRILL When bad things happen, we don’t want to remember. We try to block, resist, ignore – but we should perhaps be doing the opposite, researchers say. A new study led by scientists in Texas suggests the act of intentionally forgetting is linked to increased cerebral engagement with the unwanted information in question.Continue reading “Neuroscientists Have Revealed What Your Brain Needs to Really Erase a Memory”

What is Your First memory – and Did it Ever Really Happen?

By Dr. Lucy Justice I can remember being a baby. I recall being in a vast room inside a doctor’s surgery. I was passed to a nurse and then placed in cold metal scales to be weighed. I was always aware that this memory was unusual because it was from so early in my life,Continue reading “What is Your First memory – and Did it Ever Really Happen?”

DARPA Wants to Zap Your Brain to Boost Your Memory

We may go to sleep at night, but our brains don’t. Instead, they spend those quiet hours tidying up, and one of their chores is to lug memories into long-term storage boxes. Now, a group of scientists may have found a way to give that memory-storing process a boost, by delivering precisely timed electric zapsContinue reading “DARPA Wants to Zap Your Brain to Boost Your Memory”

New research shows that being forgetful is a sign of unusual intelligence

By Timothy Roberts Being able to recall memories, whether short-term or long-term is something that we all need in life. It comes in handy when we are studying at school or when we are trying to remember where we left our keys. We also tend to use our memory at work and remembering somebody’s nameContinue reading “New research shows that being forgetful is a sign of unusual intelligence”