Posts Tagged ‘Ireland’

by Mike McRae

Once a month, a 33-year-old Irish man would fill a syringe with his own semen and squirt it into the veins and muscles of his right arm, hoping it would make his chronic lower back pain go away.

Physicians came across this unusual case when its subject admitted himself into a Dublin hospital following several days of lower back pain brought on by lifting a heavy object.

Following an examination, medical staff discovered his lower right arm was red and slightly swollen, with signs of a fairly serious subcutaneous infection. An X-ray revealed signs of an abscess deep under the skin.

The patient disclosed it was most likely caused by recent injections of his own semen. Apparently back pain was an ongoing problem for the gentleman, and he’d come up with a rather innovative plan to treat it by introducing his own ejaculate intravenously and intramuscularly.

For the previous year and a half he’d been giving himself a monthly shot of his own self-made tonic. In the wake of his most recent bout of back pain, he had even upped his dose to several injections.

The case study is outlined in an Irish Medical Journal article playfully titled “Semenly” Harmless Back Pain: An Unusual Presentation of a Subcutaneous Abscess. Its authors dug into the literature – both clinical and alternative – for some kind of explanation, but came up empty handed.

“A comprehensive review of EMBASE, PubMed, Google scholar and the wider internet was conducted with an emphasis on intravenous semen injection for the treatment of back pain as well as for other medical and non-medical uses,” the authors write.

“Although there is a report of the effects of subcutaneous semen injection into rats and rabbits [in 1945], there were no cases of intravenous semen injection into humans found across the literature.”

Alleged health benefits of semen have been debated in the literature. It’s occasionally injected just under the skin in minuscule amounts to test for allergic reactions, and has been contested as a way to treat semen-sensitivities.

But when it comes to reducing pain, let alone specifically treating back injuries, this is pretty much unheard of.

The patient was diagnosed with cellulitis – a bacterial infection of the skin – and the doctors gave him intravenous antimicrobial drugs; but before they could administer further treatment, he discharged himself.

This research was published in the Irish Medical Journal.

https://www.sciencealert.com/patient-injected-himself-with-semen-thinking-it-would-cure-his-back-pain

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Irish aviation officials are investigating after two airline pilots reported seeing unidentified flying objects off the southwest coast of Ireland last week, the Irish Examiner reports. A pilot of a British Airways flight contacted air control last Friday, November 9, asking if there were military scheduled in the airpace. Air control said there was nothing showing for that evening.

“It was moving so fast,” the pilot said, according to audio of the call released by LiveATC.net. “It appeared on our left hand side and rapidly veered to the north. We saw a bright light and then it disappeared at a very high speed.”

A second pilot, flying a Virgin Airlines plane, also called into air traffic control. “A meteor or another object making some kind of re-entry. It appears to be multiple objects following the same sort of trajectory. They were very bright from where we were.”

In a statement to CBS News, the Irish Aviation Authority said the reports will be “investigated under the normal confidential occurrence investigation process.”

In March, two airline pilots claimed to see UFOs fly over their planes in Arizona’s airspace. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) admitted that it didn’t know what the object was either, and released audio of the radio broadcasts.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/pilots-report-seeing-ufo-sky-off-ireland-2018-11-12/?ftag=CNM-00-10aag7e

Possession of ecstasy and other drugs is currently legal in Ireland, but only for a day, after a court ruling on Tuesday morning.

A written judgment released by the Republic’s court of appeal said part of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1977, which allows certain substances to be controlled, is unconstitutional, meaning all government orders banning substances such as ecstasy and magic mushrooms are void – and it is not an offence to possess them.

Specifically, the court found that the act was being added to via ministerial order and without consulting the Oireachtas (both houses of the Irish parliament) and deemed this unconstitutional.

The appeal court’s ruling came in favor of a man who was prosecuted for possession of methylethcathinone, which was among a number of substances put on the controlled drugs list in 2010.

Stanislav Bederev denied the charge of having the substance for supply in 2012, and then brought a high court challenge in Dublin seeking to stop his trial, claiming that additions to the 1977 act were unconstitutional.

Bederev’s legal team argued it was not lawful to put the substance on the controlled drug list because there are no principles and policies guiding the introduction of such rules – and specifically no consultation with the Irish parliament.

The Irish government now has to force through emergency legislation in its parliament on Tuesday evening in response to the ruling.

The emergency law won’t come into place until the Republic’s second chamber, the Seanad, endorses the legislation. Following that the country’s president, Michael D Higgins, will have to gave his approval.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/mar/10/irish-es-are-smiling-ecstasy-drugs-temporarily-legal-in-ireland