New research shows that being forgetful is a sign of unusual intelligence

By Timothy Roberts Being able to recall memories, whether short-term or long-term is something that we all need in life. It comes in handy when we are studying at school or when we are trying to remember where we left our keys. We also tend to use our memory at work and remembering somebody’s nameContinue reading “New research shows that being forgetful is a sign of unusual intelligence”

Could a Dose of Sunshine Make You Smarter?

By Ruth Williams The sun’s ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a major cause of skin cancer, but it offers some health benefits too, such as boosting production of essential vitamin D and improving mood. A recent report in Cell adds enhanced learning and memory to UV’s unexpected benefits. Researchers have discovered that, in mice, exposure toContinue reading “Could a Dose of Sunshine Make You Smarter?”

New study suggests that living in dim light can affect our brains

By Andy Henion Spending too much time in dimly lit rooms and offices may actually change the brain’s structure and hurt one’s ability to remember and learn, indicates groundbreaking research by Michigan State University neuroscientists. The researchers studied the brains of Nile grass rats (which, like humans, are diurnal and sleep at night) after exposingContinue reading “New study suggests that living in dim light can affect our brains”

This is How You Raise Successful Teens, and It Starts When They’re Toddlers With a 3-Part Adaptive Cascade

by Drake Baer, Senior writer at Thrive Global covering the brain and social sciences. Teachers, parents and policymakers are finally started to realize that academic success depends on more than just “booksmarts,” the kind of fluid intelligence captured by IQ tests and the like. The importance of “soft” or “non-cognitive” skills like grit and emotionalContinue reading “This is How You Raise Successful Teens, and It Starts When They’re Toddlers With a 3-Part Adaptive Cascade”

How your face betrays your personality, health and intelligence

By David Robson You might expect a great philosopher to look past our surface into the depths of the soul – but Ancient Greek thinkers were surprisingly concerned with appearance. Aristotle and his followers even compiled a volume of the ways that your looks could reflect your spirit. “Soft hair indicates cowardice and coarse hairContinue reading “How your face betrays your personality, health and intelligence”

Octopus DNA reveals secrets to intelligence

The elusive octopus genome has finally been untangled, which should allow scientists to discover answers to long-mysterious questions about the animal’s alienlike physiology: How does it camouflage itself so expertly? How does it control—and regenerate—those eight flexible arms and thousands of suckers? And, most vexing: How did a relative of the snail get to beContinue reading “Octopus DNA reveals secrets to intelligence”

Human intelligence is withering as computers do more, but there’s a solution.

Computers are taking over the kinds of knowledge work long considered the preserve of well-educated, well-trained professionals. By Nicholas Carr Artificial intelligence has arrived. Today’s computers are discerning and sharp. They can sense the environment, untangle knotty problems, make subtle judgments and learn from experience. They don’t think the way we think—they’re still as mindlessContinue reading “Human intelligence is withering as computers do more, but there’s a solution.”