Ice eggs in Finland wash up on beach

By Nicoletta Lanese

Smooth balls of ice rolled ashore on a beach in Finland and piled up like a gigantic clutch of turtles’ eggs.

But where did these “ice eggs” come from? Turns out, the frigid orbs were sculpted by a peculiar combination of weather and waves, according to news reports.

Amateur photographer Risto Mattila stumbled upon the strange sight while walking with his wife on Hailuoto Island, a land mass between Finland and Sweden, according to BBC News. The temperature hovered around 32 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 1 degree Celsius) that day, he said, and the wind whipped across the beach. “There, we found this amazing phenomenon. There was snow and ice eggs along the beach near the water line,” he told the BBC.

The “ice eggs” littered an area the length of about one-quarter of a football field and ranged in size from that of an average chicken egg to that of a hefty soccer ball, Mattila said. He snapped a photo, noting that he had “never seen anything like this during 25 years living in the vicinity.”

Others came upon the ice eggs, too. “This was [an] amazing phenomenon, [I’ve] never seen before. The whole beach was full of these ice balls,” Tarja Terentjeff, who lives in the nearby town of Oulu, told CNN. Another local, Sirpa Tero, told CNN she’d seen icy orbs line the shoreline before, “but not over such a large area.”

Although fairly rare, these ice eggs form similarly to sea glass or rounded stones that wash up on the beach, said BBC Weather expert George Goodfellow. Chunks of ice break off from larger ice sheets in the sea and either taxi to shore on the incoming tide or get pushed in by gusts of wind at the water’s surface, he explained. Waves buffet the ice chunks as they travel, slowly eroding their jagged edges into smooth curves. Seawater sticks and freezes to the forming eggs, causing them to grow like snowballs do as they roll across the ground.

Once the ice chunks reach shore, pounding waves tend to buff out any lingering kinks on their surfaces, leaving behind nothing but sleek and shiny “eggs” for curious tourists to happen upon.

https://www.livescience.com/ice-eggs-in-finland-beach.html?utm_source=Selligent&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=9881&utm_content=20191108_LS_Essentials_Newsletter+-+adhoc+&utm_term=3675605&m_i=KLvdVq2D1jG_1ZlsN2BtGnhxz5lDWnoT1z5TH7nDwaq0voJwXv3R_F4qtiVoYAKPhitMFL_skBWImJ%2By0oVarC4t%2Bc9VnaCZKB

Belgian town cooks giant omelet from 10,000 eggs

A Belgian town honored its 22-year-old tradition of making a giant omelet on Tuesday amidst an egg contamination scare, cooking 10,000 eggs in a pan four meters wide.

Millions of chicken eggs have been pulled from European supermarket shelves as a result of the scare over the use of the insecticide fipronil, which is forbidden in the food chain and can cause organ damage in humans.

Hundreds of people gathered in the eastern Belgian city of Malmedy undeterred by the scare and the president of the local branch of the giant omelet fraternity, Benedicte Mathy, said she was confident Tuesday s dish was safe to eat.

Under a timid Belgian sun and with music playing they tucked into the giant omelet cooked over an open fire by “The World Fraternity of Knights of the Giant Omelette”, which was created in 1973.

http://dunyanews.tv/en/WeirdNews/401552-Belgian-town-cooks-giant-omelet-from-10000-eggs

Perfectly round egg sells on eBay for £480

A “perfectly spherical” chicken egg has sold for an “unbelievable” £480 on the internet auction site eBay.

Kim Broughton found one of her hens – now renamed Ping Pong – had laid the round egg in her garden in Latchingdon, Essex, on 17 February – Pancake Day.

She decided to auction the egg in aid of the Cystic Fibrosis Trust after a friend’s son died from the disease.

Ms Broughton, 44, said she imagined the buyer was interested in preserving, rather than eating, the unusual egg.

The item, laid by a Buff Orpington hen – described as the “Scarlett Johansson of the chicken world” – attracted 64 bids, but the identity of the winner is not yet known.

Ms Broughton said she had been tempted to cook and eat the egg before being told it was “one-in-a-billion”.

She said: “I was literally about to crack it open to make a pancake when a mate saw the photo I put on Facebook and messaged me to say ‘Don’t do it!’

“Apparently somebody had sold one before for more than £90 so I thought ‘Great if I can sell if for that’.

“When it was at £20 I thought ‘Who’d pay that for an egg?’ and then it went through the roof. It’s unbelievable”.

Ms Broughton, who said she was known as “the mad chicken woman”, said she was nervous about sending the egg through the post.

“At the moment it’s safely in my son’s lunchbox padded with kitchen roll – but if I send it in a hard box it should be quite safe,” she said.

Speaking to BBC Essex Ms Broughton said she would be keeping a close eye on future eggs in the hope of raising “a few more quid” for the charity.

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-essex-31668640